Shrubs, trees, ground covers, native plants, and seasonal color

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Click on any of the alpha indexes below to view the corresponding lists of plants.

The default list is displayed alphabetically by common name for all plant types. You can view the plants by clicking on the Scientific Name or limit the plant type by using the drop down.

Plants actively being grown for the current season are shown -- selecting Discontinued Items will show plants we have offered in the past. 

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Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Caladium

Caladium

Botanical Name: Caladium x

Popular perennial (grown as annuals ) known for the colorful heart-shaped leaves available in several colors with many variations with streaks, spots, and patterns. Strap leaf varieties are appropriate for afternoon sun while fancy varieties need to remain in the shade. Caladiums row 24 inches tall and wide.

 Well drained soil is appreciated, and exposure depends on the variety; strap leaf varieties can tolerate afternoon sun, while fancy leaf varieties must remain in afternoon shade. Regular watering is required during growing season, however in the winter when the plant dies back to the tubers soil should be kept dry.

Sun Tolerant Varieties for 2011 :

Florida Sweetheart
White Wing


Caladium

Caladium

Botanical Name: Caladium x

Popular perennial (grown as annuals) known for the colorful heart-shaped leaves available in several colors with many variations with streaks, spots, and patterns. Strap leaf varieties are appropriate for afternoon sun while fancy varieties need to remain in the shade. Caladiums row 24 inches tall and wide.

 Well drained soil is appreciated, and exposure depends on the variety; strap leaf varieties can tolerate afternoon sun, while fancy leaf varieties must remain in afternoon shade. Regular watering is required during growing season, however in the winter when the plant dies back to the tubers soil should be kept dry.

Shade Only Caladiums for 2010 :

Carolyn Whorton
Arno Nehrling
Candidum

 


Century Plant

Century Plant

Botanical Name: Agave americana

The largest of the Agave that forms a natueral rosette pattern.  A single massive flower stalk appearing anytime between 10 to 25 years from germination, and can reach up to 15 feet. Cluster of greenish-white flowers appear, at which time the main plant begins to die. After the Century Plant is dead, multiple offshoots from the underground rhizomes will start to grow. 

Leaves have sharp spines that require care when handling, and should not be planted too close to walkways. Avoid planting in poorly drained areas. 


Cherry Laurel, Compact

Cherry Laurel, Compact

Botanical Name: Prunus caroliniana 'Compacta'

The Cherry Laurel species is native to East Texas where it thrives with the regular rainfall and acidic soils. It tolerates heat, drought, and wind so well, that it is utilized nearly anywhere Texas. 

‘Compacta’ is a cultivar with more compact growth habit, smaller leaf size, and a maturing at half the size of the regular Cherry Laurel. The small bright-green leaves have the odor of maraschino cherries when crushed, and are toxic. Fragrant white flowers cover the branches in the early spring, easily attracting butterflies and bees. They are followed by small black cherry fruits that only wildlife can enjoy, as they are poisonous to us as well.

Compact Cherry Laurel responds well to pruning, and often is sheared into cone shapes to keep its compact form.  


Coleus, Mixed

Coleus, Mixed

Botanical Name: Coleus x

Popular fast growing bedding plant for the summer that does best in filtered to full shade.

Attractive foliage is opposite and simple, ovate leaves. Come in shades of yellow, dull red, purple, and pale green. Flowers are dark blue to cream, displayed in terminal spike-like racemes that reach three inches long.

Coleus needs loose, well drained fertile soil, and does well as an underplanting. Mealy bugs are a problem when grown in full shade, and frequent trimming will ensure a thick bushy plant.

2010 Spring - Summer Cultivars :

Burgundy Sun
Dipt in Wine
Fishnet Stockings
Floridasun Jade
Floridasun Rose
Pineapple
Red Coat
Magilla
Wizard Mix
Wizard Mosaic


Columbine

Columbine

Botanical Name: Aquilegia hinckleyana 'Texas Gold'
Fern-like perennial that forms a soft mound, with attractive flowers in spring and sporadically throughout summer. Bright yellow blooms appear on long branches that grow above the plant, with long spurs in the back. Prefers constant moisture, reseeds very easily and becomes unsightly with age – easily removed and make room for the newer plants that germinated. Subject to aphids, leafminers, and spider mites in dry climates, and will go dormant in hot dry summers before it normally does in winter.

Copper Canyon Daisy

Copper Canyon Daisy

Botanical Name: Tagetes lemmonii

Bushy perennial that heavily covers itself with yellow daisy-like blooms in the spring and fall, and intermittently during the summer. Great tolerance to hot and dry areas. Grows up to six feet tall and four feet wide, but can get weedy-looking and will recover quickly from pruning in the warm seasons. Foliage has a bitter aroma.


Member of Plants for Texas Program


Cotoneaster, Grayleaf

Cotoneaster, Grayleaf

Botanical Name: Cotoneaster glaucophyllus

Often mispronounced as the two separate words Coton and Easter, Cotoneaster is one of the more durable and hardy landscape shrubs for the Texas landscape. It tolerates urban conditions, poor soils, and even drought – but thrives when given favorable care.

It has an appealing shade of gray-green foliage that is slightly pubescent, arranged on low arching branches that somewhat form a thicket. The small leaves and compact form allow to be pruned into thick hedges easily. Clusters of small white flowers appear on the branches throughout the spring, and are followed by red berries that persist throughout the fall. 


Crape Myrtle, Basham

Crape Myrtle, Basham

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Basham'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Basham' is a large growing cultivar with light pink blooms; it is a powdery mildew resistant cultivar. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds. 

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Dynamite

Crape Myrtle, Dynamite

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Dynamite'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Natchez

Crape Myrtle, Natchez

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Natchez'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Natchez' is a large cultivar, one of the largest available, with bright white blooms. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Pink Velour

Crape Myrtle, Pink Velour

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Pink Velour'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Pink Velour has burgundy-green leaves that get dark red-bronze in the fall, with pink blooms. Powdery Mildew resistant cultivar.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Purple

Crape Myrtle, Purple

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Catawba' is a medium sized tree, with a fine rich purple bloom color. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Red

Crape Myrtle, Red

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Red Rocket

Crape Myrtle, Red Rocket

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Red Rocket'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Red Rocket' is an improved powdery mildew resistance cultivar with rich red blooms.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Tuscarora

Crape Myrtle, Tuscarora

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Tuscarora'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Tuscarora' is an improved powdery mildew resistance cultivar with light red blooms, often used in leu of Watermelon Red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, White

Crape Myrtle, White

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crossvine

Crossvine

Botanical Name: Bignonia capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty'

A Texas native semi-evergreen vine that climbs fences, trellises, and trees easily with its small tendrils. It can reach lengths up to 40 feet, easily attracting hummingbirds and butterflies throughout the blooming season.

'Tangerine Beauty' is a cultivar reintroduced by J.C. Ralston of the University of North Carolina. The flowers are borne in clusters, each being pinkish-red with an orange-yellow throat. The bright green leaves turn an attractive red to purple hue in the winter after the first cold front. .

Crossvine is somewhat drought and poor soil tolerant, exhibiting no pest issues.


Cuphea, Bat Face

Cuphea, Bat Face

Botanical Name: Cuphea llavea

Small mounding perennial native to Mexico that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies easily. Produces a multitude of 1" red tubular flowers with purple throats open at the end with small patterns of a bat (hence the name)

Member of Plants for Texas Program


Cypress, Italian

Cypress, Italian

Botanical Name: Cupressus sempervirens

A species of cypress that is native to the Mediterranean which distinctively stands out with its very tall and narrow growth habit. It requires unique placement in any landscape, getting no more than a few feet wide yet up to 40 feet tall.

The erect branches do not branch far out from the main trunk, and have scale-like leaves produced off shoots of the branches. The dense, dark green leaves hold their color year round; in colder climates to the north the tree forms a narrow cone-shape. The seed cones are not readily visible when mixed in with the leaves.

Requires well drained soils, and appreciates regular watering and fertilization. 


Cypress, Montezuma

Cypress, Montezuma

Botanical Name: Taxodium mucronatum

Native to Mexico and the Rio Grande area of Texas, Montezuma Cypress is also known as Sabino or Ahuehuete; it is the national tree of Mexico. There is a specimen called “Tule” in Santa Maria that is estimated to be 2,000 years old.

Montezuma Cypress tree is an ideal substitute for the Bald Cypress, as it holds onto its leaves better during cold weather. In warmer areas of Southern Texas, it remains evergreen. Extremely versatile as it thrives in river beds and standing water, it tolerates drought like conditions anywhere in Texas.  When grown in standing water, it produces “knees” that are characteristic of the Taxodium cypresses.

They are often staked when cultivated in the nursery industry, as they are fast growing and the wood is weak when young. The branches have a natural weeping habit to them, and have pinnately arranged flat leaves that are needle-like, looking very delicate from a distance. The tree forms a broad spreading crown. The bark is brown to tan in color, with slight shredded-like exfoliation.