Shrubs, trees, ground covers, native plants, and seasonal color

Wholesale Only

Click on any of the alpha indexes below to view the corresponding lists of plants.

The default list is displayed alphabetically by common name for all plant types. You can view the plants by clicking on the Scientific Name or limit the plant type by using the drop down.

Plants actively being grown for the current season are shown -- selecting Discontinued Items will show plants we have offered in the past. 

Select Plant Type:
Include:  Discontinued Items
Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Fern, Foxtail

Fern, Foxtail

Botanical Name: Asparagus densiflorus 'Meyerii'

Semi-hardy herbaceous perennial with arching, feather stems that form a dense frond with a open 'fluffy' look that resembles a fox's tail. Ideal for containers to relocate in the winter to protect from freezing temperatures. 

Small white flowers start to appear in the late spring and summer, followed by bright red berries with seeds instead of spores which disqualifies this plant as a true fern. 


Fern, Holly

Fern, Holly

Botanical Name: Cyrtomium falcatum

Evergreen fern that performs exceptionally well in acidic soils with good drainage and regular fertilization. Forms a rounded mound of glossy dark green leaves that unfurl and lay down slightly. The name comes from the holy-like leaves on the fronds. It tolerates sun better than other ferns, however the strong Texas heat combined with the sunlight will burn the foliage. 

Grows back easily after a heavy trimming when the foliage becomes sunburned or frayed - use caution not to cut into the crown.  Rough spots on the backs of leaves are sori: the structures that contain and disperse fern spores. They are not harmful to the holly fern, but often confused as a plant infection or pest. 


Fern, River

Fern, River

Botanical Name: Dryopteris normalis

Fast growing Texas native fern that demands moist, well drained acidic soils throughout the spring and summer. Semi-evergreen in warmer areas, but dies back to the roots completely if temperatures drop below freezing. Leaves are a light green hue, very graceful and delicate. Spreads easily by underground runners. 

Although it is drought tolerant, it dies back to the roots and will only return during wet conditions. Will outright die within twelve months if the conditions do not become favorable. 

 


Fern, Sprengeri

Fern, Sprengeri

Botanical Name: Asparagus densiflorus 'Sprengeri'

Open airy leaves and the light graceful form gave this plant it's name, however it is not a true fern as it self propagates by seeds and root stems. Small white flowers appear in the summer, followed by red berries that are enjoyed by birds.

Turns an unsightly shade of yellow in the heat of full sun, however maintains a healthy dark green in shade. 


Fig Tree

Fig Tree

Botanical Name: Ficus carica 'Celeste'

A popular fruit tree for Texas that grows well in the ground or in containers. The tree sap is milky and irritating to the skin. Not ideal for small landscapes, as it can feasilbly grow 40' feel tall and wide and block out sunlight to any plants under it.

Fig trees normally put out two crops - the Breba Crop and Main Crop. The Breba Crop is the first, with fruits appearing in the spring on last seasons' new growth. The Main Crop comes in the fall on that seasons' new growth.

Growth as mentioned can get quite overbearing, and loss of fruits is likely if pruned heavily.

Water young fig trees regularly till established. Thereafter, provide a deep watering every one or two weeks. Fig Trees benefit from heavy mulching, which retains the soil moisture.


Fig Vine

Fig Vine

Botanical Name: Ficus pumila

A vigorous growing vine native to East Asia that has found itself useful in the southern Texas landscapes.

Two types of leaves exist for the Fig Vine; the young leaves are small, no larger than one inch and are borne on young stems that do nothing more than climb any surface they touch. This, coupled with the vigorous growth habit allow Fig Vine to cover walls, trees, and even buildings relatively quickly and completely. Once the vine finds it has nothing left to climb, adult stems will emerge with larger, thicker leaves, and will also bear non-edible fig fruits.

Fig Vine is very tolerant of poor soil and heat. Harsh winters can kill the vine back; otherwise pruning it constantly to keep under control will be required. Be aware of the surfaces it will come into contact with, as it will damage wood fences and brick walls if forcefully removed. If you wish to remove Fig Vine with minimal damage, destroy the plant or stems at the base and allow the foliage to decompose naturally. 


Firebush

Firebush

Botanical Name: Hamelia patens

Central American native shrub that has adapted perfectly for central to south Texas.

Fast growing semi-evergreen shrub with very showy terminal clusters of red-orange tubular flowers that easily attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Small juicy red fruits in the fall attract birds.

Grows best in full sun; becomes uniniformed and blooms less in the shaded enviroments. Requires well drained soils, and performs best with regular watering but will tolerate drought conditions. An excellent perennial for central Texas, and annual to the north. No pest or disease problems.

A member of the Plants for Texas program.


Garlic (Society)

Garlic (Society)

Botanical Name: Tulbaghia violacea
Aromatic perennial with a strong garlic-onion fragrance. Purple blooms persist spring to fall, reaching up to three feet tall.

Germander, Bush

Germander, Bush

Botanical Name: Teucrium fruticans

Bush Germander is a perfect perennial for rock gardens, as it tolerates heat, poor and rocky soils, and even salt spray; it’s only real demand is for well-drained soils.  Gray-green leaves have silvery-white undersides on white stems, giving this medium sized shrub an overall silvery appearance. Blooms mid-winter to mid-summer with deep blue flowers often attracting bees and butterflies.

Responds well to regular trimming, otherwise maintains a loose and open round shape. 


Giant Agave

Giant Agave

Botanical Name: Agave salmiana

Large Agave that forms a natueral rosett pattern, and can put out offsets through underground rhizomes. A single massive flower stalk emerges in the middle of summer and can reach up to 10 feet tall with yellow blooms. 

Leaves have sharp spines that require care when handling, and should not be planted too close to walkways. Avoid planting in poorly drained areas. 


Giant Farox Agave

Giant Farox Agave

Botanical Name: Agave salmiana 'Farox'

Large Agave that forms a natueral rosett pattern, and can put out offsets through underground rhizomes. A single massive flower stalk emerges in the middle of summer and can reach up to 10 feet tall with bright yellow blooms. 

Leaves have sharp spines that require care when handling, and should not be planted too close to walkways. Avoid planting in poorly drained areas. 


Grass, Dwarf Hameln

Grass, Dwarf Hameln

Botanical Name: Pennisetum alopecuroides 'Hameln'
Small perennial ornamental grass with a mounded growth habit. Growing only three feet tall and two feet wide. Dwarf Hameln grass has green-white flower plumes in fall.

Grass, Gulf Muhly

Grass, Gulf Muhly

Botanical Name: Muhlenbergia capillaris
Dwarf ornamental grass with very attractive pink-red flowers in the fall. Excellent in massings. Will grow back after a freeze and return in the spring.

Grass, Muhly

Grass, Muhly

Botanical Name: Muhlenbergia lindheimeri
Perennial semi-dwarf grass reaching to four feet tall and wide. Silver-white plumes in the fall are a striking display before receeding in a cold winter just to return in spring.

Grass, Pampas Dwarf

Grass, Pampas Dwarf

Botanical Name: Cortaderia selloana 'Pumila'
Dwarf cultivar of Pampas grass that reaches only five feet tall and wide. Large white flower plumes in the fall. Makes an excellent large barrier. Foliage is sharp, and can cut skin.

Grass, Purple Fountain

Grass, Purple Fountain

Botanical Name: Pennisetum setaceum 'Atrosanguineum'
Clumping perennial grass with outstanding purple foliage throught the warm season, and pinkish-purple flowers in the fall. Will die in a freeze; often treated as an annual.