Shrubs, trees, ground covers, native plants, and seasonal color

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Click on any of the alpha indexes below to view the corresponding lists of plants.

The default list is displayed alphabetically by common name for all plant types. You can view the plants by clicking on the Scientific Name or limit the plant type by using the drop down.

Plants actively being grown for the current season are shown -- selecting Discontinued Items will show plants we have offered in the past. 

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Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Japanese Blueberry Shrub

Japanese Blueberry Shrub

Botanical Name: Elaeocarpus decipiens

Native to Japan, the Japanese Blueberry Tree is a fast grower that needs plenty of room in the landscape. It exhibits a dense growth habit, multiple branching with an upright form. It isn’t terribly cold hardy, but will survive south of Austin if mulch in the winters.

New leaves emerge bronze, turning bright green before maturing dark green. Although evergreen, the older leaves will turn red and fall in the winter. Butterflies are easily attracted to the slightly fragrant greenish-white flowers that appear early in the summer, five-petaled and urn-shaped in racemes. Blue-black olive fruits mature in the fall, and are somewhat messy if planted near walkways.

Blueberry tree prefers well-drained alkaline soils. It responds very well to pruning and is versatile when shaped into a topiary or tree form. 


Japanese Blueberry Tree - Tree Form

Japanese Blueberry Tree - Tree Form

Botanical Name: Elaeocarpus decipiens

Native to Japan, the Japanese Blueberry Tree is a fast grower that needs plenty of room in the landscape. It exhibits a dense growth habit, multiple branching with an upright form. It isn’t terribly cold hardy, but will survive south of Austin if mulch in the winters.

New leaves emerge bronze, turning bright green before maturing dark green. Although evergreen, the older leaves will turn red and fall in the winter. Butterflies are easily attracted to the slightly fragrant greenish-white flowers that appear early in the summer, five-petaled and urn-shaped in racemes. Blue-black olive fruits mature in the fall, and are somewhat messy if planted near walkways.

Blueberry tree prefers well-drained alkaline soils. It responds very well to pruning and is versatile when shaped into a topiary or tree form. 


Jasmine, Asian

Jasmine, Asian

Botanical Name: Trachelospermum asiaticum
Contrary to the name, this is not a true Jasmine. Native to Asia, it has become widespread in the landscape as it is the most common choice when it comes to ground covers. Fast and vigorous growing, this evergreen tolerates heat and adverse conditions with no real pest issues. It will prefer and perform better in rich well-drained soils, but is drought tolerant once established. Spreads easily as the stems sprout roots when coming into contact with the ground, and often gets thick enough to prevent most weeds from growing. Although many other sources claim there are yellow and highly fragrant blooms, it's rare to see in Texas.

Jasmine, Carolina

Jasmine, Carolina

Botanical Name: Gelsemium sempervirens

Native to the southeastern US, the Carolina Jasmine is a popular landscape choice despite all parts containing a toxin that can be fatal if consumed.

This Jasmine grows best in the average homeowners landscape as it will grow only up to 20 feet, and responds will to regular pruning. Outstanding yellow trumpet shaped flowers appear early in the spring and persist for several weeks. Leaf spot is a common issue in wet months, so it is best planted in well ventilated and sunny areas.


Jasmine, Confederate

Jasmine, Confederate

Botanical Name: Trachelospermum jasminoides
Popular evergreen vine, also known as Star Jasmine, for the five petaled white flowers that are extremely fragrant, appearing in the spring. Climbs easily if grown near a lattice or trellis, otherwise will become a clumping groundcover spreading up to 20 feet.

Jasmine, Primrose

Jasmine, Primrose

Botanical Name: Jasminum mesnyi

Often used on highway medians, Primrose Jasmine is a fast growing, drought tolerant, and all-around tough shrub that needs its space in the landscape.   It features an open sprawling habit, often growing wider than tall. When grown along fence lines and walls, it grows somewhat vine like, reaching greater heights.

The green stems are square instead of round like most plants, with dark green glossy leaves divided into three leaflets. Primrose is best pruned in the winter – not only for removal of old foliage, but blooms will only appear on new growth. In the early spring the shrub is covered in slightly-fragrant yellow semi-double blooms that persist for a few weeks, sporadically until fall thereafter.

The branches grow up to lengths of eight feet on average, and drape gracefully around the shrub to form a large thick mound. In moist and fertile areas, branch tips touching the ground will sprout roots, self propagating the shrub to even greater widths. Smaller landscapes will require Primose to be pruned regularly, whereas in large open areas it’s an excellent massing, border, or even erosion controller. 


Lamb's Ear

Lamb's Ear

Botanical Name: Stachys byzantina 'Helene Von Stein'

A mat-forming perennial with grey-white pubescent leaves that reach up to five inches in length, forming a small round mound. Flower stalks reach up to 18 inches, with small purple-pink flowers that are half an inch wide.

Grown best in the spring before humidity can adversly affect the foliage; best if planted in full sun and highly ventilated places.


Lantana, Confetti

Lantana, Confetti

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.

Texas native bush variety Lantana reaching reaching heights of five to six feet tall and wide.


Lantana, Gold

Lantana, Gold

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.

A popular herbaceous perennial found in all areas of Texas.   A wide selection of cultivars to choose from, Lantana can be an ideal ground cover or shrub.  Moderately fast growing, Lantana blooms early in the spring and continues until frost, attracting butterflies easily.  Once establish, lantana is drought tolerant, relatively pest free, and low maintenance. 

New Gold Lantana is a sterile variety which will not produce berries, ensuring continuous blooming throughout the warm season. Reaching only an average of a foot high but several feet wide, it makes an ideal groundcover, erosion control, cover sides for raised beds, or even hanging baskets. 


Lantana, Purple

Lantana, Purple

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.

A popular herbaceous perennial found in all areas of Texas.   A wide selection of cultivars to choose from, Lantana can be an ideal ground cover or shrub.  Moderately fast growing, Lantana blooms early in the spring and continues until frost, attracting butterflies easily.  Once establish, lantana is drought tolerant, relatively pest free, and low maintenance. 

Trailing Purple Lantana is a sterile variety which will not produce berries, ensuring continuous blooming. Unlike the White or Gold Lantana, Purple Lantana blooms better in the warmer winter over the hot summers.  Reaching only an average of a foot high but several feet wide, it makes an ideal groundcover, erosion control, cover sides for raised beds, or even hanging baskets. 


Lantana, Radiation

Lantana, Radiation

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.
Texas native plant reaching heights of four feet, with several cultivars and colors to choose from. Highly durable perennial for any Texas landscape.

Lantana, White

Lantana, White

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.

A popular herbaceous perennial found in all areas of Texas.   A wide selection of cultivars to choose from, Lantana can be an ideal ground cover or shrub.  Moderately fast growing, Lantana blooms early in the spring and continues until frost, attracting butterflies easily.  Once establish, lantana is drought tolerant, relatively pest free, and low maintenance. 

Trailing White Lantana is a sterile variety which will not produce berries, ensuring continuous blooming throughout the warm season. Reaching only an average of a foot high but several feet wide, it makes an ideal groundcover, erosion control, cover sides for raised beds, or even hanging baskets. 


Ligustrum, Japanese

Ligustrum, Japanese

Botanical Name: Ligustrum lucidum

Native to Japan, this fast grower is recognized as a strong candidate for poor-soil and drought-prone landscapes. The dull-green leaves have a distinct pointed tip, and are arranged opposite on the stems that quickly shoot up from the base in several directions. Naturally forms an large open habit shrub,  but is easily pruned into a small tree. It is not uncommon to find it pruned into topiary shapes, although Waxleaf Ligustrum would be a more ideal choice.

Large clusters up to eight inches in length appear in the spring, bearing slightly fragrant white flowers. They are followed by green berries in the summer, turning dark blue to black for the winter.  Birds feast on the berries, and then distribute the seeds across the area. Due to the ease of germination, Japanese Ligustrum spreads quickly.

If planting in a row, remember Japanese Ligustrum can reach widths of 15 feet. Although drought tolerant, leaves will droop, but spring back after receiving water. No notable plant disease issues. 


Ligustrum, Varigated Privit

Ligustrum, Varigated Privit

Botanical Name: Ligustrum sinense 'Variegatum'

This quick growing cultivar of the Green Ligustrum has creamy white and green foliage, making an excellent choice for an accent plant or a distinctive hedge. Multiple stems form a somewhat thick clump, and are not adversely affected by regular pruning. The branches are thin and flexible, and will exhibit a slight weeping or fountain look when left unpruned at maturity. It is not uncommon for a few of the branches to revert back to being fully green, giving the impression two plants occupy the same space.

Variegated Privit requires ample sunlight to maintain thick leaf cover; avoid planting in too much shade or next to plants or buildings that will subject it to full shade.

Bright white flowers appear in the spring on new stems, and are somewhat visible against the foliage. Unnoticeable black fruits follow in the fall. No serious pest issues, but it can’t grow in wet or compacted soils.  


Ligustrum, Waxleaf

Ligustrum, Waxleaf

Botanical Name: Ligustrum japonicum 'Texanum'

Native to Japan, the Waxleaf Ligustrum is the most universally applied choice for a sculpted hedge plant in the Texas landscape; it is fast growing and not picky about when it is pruned. In addition to being pruned into hedges, it also can be pruned into a topiary, pyramidal form, or even a small tree.  

Highly fragrant  panicles of white flowers appear in the late spring, and carry into the early summer. Small dull blue-black fruits develop in the fall, attracting birds easily.

It differs from Japanese Ligustrum by having very glossy dark green leaves that easily snap when bent, and have no pointed tip. Once established, it’s very drought tolerant and grows well in urban or salty areas. 'Texanum' is a dwarf cultivar with a tighter growth habit, as well as reaching only heights up to nine feet. 

 


Lirope, Aztec Grass

Lirope, Aztec Grass

Botanical Name: Lirope gigantea 'Aztec'
Clump forming plant with blue blooms in the summer, followed by black berries in the fall. Maturing at 30 inches tall and 24 inches wide, Aztec Grass is ideal for small hedges or contrasting borders. Leaves are green with white margins.

Lirope, Big Blue

Lirope, Big Blue

Botanical Name: Lirope muscari 'Big Blue'
Clump forming plant with blue blooms in the summer, followed by black berries in the fall. Growing only 12 inches tall and wide, Big Blue forms a small dense mass, with leaves that lay down in the cold winters.

Lirope, Giant

Lirope, Giant

Botanical Name: Lirope gigantea
Clump forming plants that have blue blooms in the summer, with black berries in the fall. Ideal small hedge or border plant, reaching only 30 inches tall and 24 inches wide.

Loquat, Japanese Plum

Loquat, Japanese Plum

Botanical Name: Eriobotrya japonica

Native to China and Japan, the Japanese Plum loquat is an excellent medium sized tree that tolerates alkaline soils and drought, making it ideal for the Texas landscape. It makes an ideal specimen, accent, or privacy screen when several are grown in a row.

Large thick leaves are up to twelve inches in length, dark green on top and light green on the bottom; new leaves are rust-colored and slightly pubescent. Fragrant clusters of yellow-white flowers appear in the early winter, which attract bees and butterflies easily. If grown in areas devoid of freezing temperatures, fruits develop and ripen in the spring.  When ripe, they attract birds and wasp, so avoid planning right next to areas people sit or walk.