Shrubs, trees, ground covers, native plants, and seasonal color

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Click on any of the alpha indexes below to view the corresponding lists of plants.

The default list is displayed alphabetically by common name for all plant types. You can view the plants by clicking on the Scientific Name or limit the plant type by using the drop down.

Plants actively being grown for the current season are shown -- selecting Discontinued Items will show plants we have offered in the past. 

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Include:  Discontinued Items
Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Palm, Mediterrarean Fan

Palm, Mediterrarean Fan

Botanical Name: Chamaerops humilis

The Mediterranean Fan palm, or European Fan Palm, is a cold-hardy palm that keeps a maintainable size at 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide. The main trunk is often covered in brown bristly-hairs, with the base of old leaves persisting. The blue-green leaves predominantly have an upright habit, and can reach up to two feet across --the stems are lined with extremely stiff spines.

Although small and of manageable size, the Mediterranean Fan Palm often sprouts multiple trunks from the base, resulting in a clump-forming palm as it matures. Although some home owners desire to have a single trunk, it’s not easy as the small trunks are secure at the base, and the leaves are covered in those vicious spines.

Bright yellow flowers appear at the top of the trunk, but are often hidden behind the leaves and often go unnoticed. The reddish-brown fruits that follow are often unseen as well. Grows very well with regular watering, however will tolerate drought conditions and poor soils as long as it’s given adequate drainage. 


Palm, Pindo

Palm, Pindo

Botanical Name: Butia capitata

This feather leaf palm is best planted in large areas where the leaves don’t need to be trimmed to make room for walkways or traffic. The overall height of the Pindo is only 20 feet, however the leaves can reach up to 10 feet past the four foot stems, falling downward then curving back towards the trunk. They are pinnate, and blue-gray to silver-gray in color, with spines down the leaf stems.

In the late spring to early summer female palms have a thick pink-purple inflorescence emerging from the crown. Fall brings bright orange pindo dates that are popular for making jellies and jams. If left on the plant, they can create a large mess that attracts insects and vermin.

Pindo Palm doesn’t tolerate extended periods of freezing temperatures, and grows best in well-drained sandy soils. Once established, it’s incredibly drought tolerant. 


Palm, Sago

Palm, Sago

Botanical Name: Cycas revoluta

This landscape palm is a lovely conversation piece for any landscape, as it can fire up debates depending on your beliefs -- scientist estimate this plant was growing on this planet over 150 million years ago! Sago Palm is almost a misnomer, as it belongs to the plant family Cycadaceae, and is a palm only by aesthetics alone.

It forms a prominent trunk that grows very slow with age. Once or possibly twice a year, new bright green leaves emerge from the central trunk, then slowly unfurling like a fern to reveal leaves up to five feet long. Although soft to the touch and fragile, the leaves eventually harden up with a stiff midrib, sporting plenty of needle like leaves with a sharp point, turning dark green.  Leaves are noticeably larger when grown in full shade.

Sago Palm is dioecious, with easily identified blooms for the male and female. It also reproduces from small suckers borne at the base of the plant; the ideal time to remove them would be in winter with a shovel or hatchet.

Sago palm appreciates well drained soils, and a slow release fertilizer on a regular basis . Be sure to cover in freezing temperatures as leaves will die if exposed too long, and it would take quite a while to replenish all the leaves. 


Palm, Washintonia

Palm, Washintonia

Botanical Name: Washingtonia filifera

An attractive upright growing palm that sways easily in the wind as the gray-ringed trunk is at maximum twelve inches thick; this palm sways easily in the wind. Greatly appreciates rich, fertile soils but can tolerate worse and even withstand periods of drought.

The large palmate leaves have a slight drooping effect on the ends, and grow up to five feet in length and width. The leaf steams are light green with orange streaks, and have prominent spines along both edges. Once the older leaves die, they lay down flat and begin to form a highly attractive skirt or curtain around the trunk. Several years’ worth of leaves will continue to fall and pile on each other, which although attractive, can become the home of rats and other vermin -- great care must be taken when pruning old dead leaves.

Creamy white inflorescences appear in the early summer on stalks up to ten feet in length, growing out beyond the leaves. They produce black berries that easily attract wildlife, or germinate quickly after falling to the ground.  


Palm, Windmill

Palm, Windmill

Botanical Name: Trachycarpus fortunei

Windmill Palm is the most cold-hardy upright palm available for the state of Texas. Relatively fast growing if grown in fertile soil with regular watering, but can grow in drought conditions with little soil nutrients.

Windmill is idea in tight landscape areas as it’s completely upright growing, with the main trunk no more than twelve inches in diameter. The large palm leaves are at the end of stems up to three feet in length, forming a nearly completely symmetrical crown. To assist in identification, there are no thorns on the palm branches. The upper trunk is covered in a loose mat of brown fiber, while lower trunk is uncovered, displaying a handsome smooth ringed trunk.

 Windmill is dioecious, meaning only the female will bear large long branched inflorescence blooms in the spring, with clusters of blue fruits in the fall. 


Pansy

Pansy

Botanical Name: Viola x

Popular bedding plants that bloom all winter long. Mainly come in a blue-yellow-white flower, but also available in yellows, creams, and blues. Self-seeds easily.

2009 Expected Cultivars:

Colossus Deep Blue W/ Blotch
Colossus Neon Violet
Colossus Red W/ Blotch
Colossus Rose W/ Blotch
Colossus White W/ Blotch
Colossus Yellow W/ Blotch
Delta Blaze Mix
Delta Blue W/ Blotch
Delta Primose W/ Blotch
Delta Premium Deep Blue W/ Blotch
Delta Premium Pure Golden Yellow
Delta Premium Pure Yellow
Delta Premium Pure Violet
Delta Premium White W/ Blotch
Delta Premium True Blue
Delta Premium Pure Red
Delta Premium Pure White
Delta Premium Pure Violet
Delta Premium Yellow W/ Blotch
Designer Rising Sun
Dynamite Wine Flash
MG II BOnfire
MG II Marina Shades
MG II Ocean
MG II Purple W/ Bloth
MG II Red W/ Blotch
MG II White W/ Blotch
MG II Yellow W/ Blotch
Matrix Purple
Matrix Sunrise
Matrix White W/ Blotch
Matrix Yellow W/ Blotch


Pavonia, Rock Rose

Pavonia, Rock Rose

Botanical Name: Pavonia lasiopetala

Rock Rose is an extremely drought tolerant Texas native found thriving in the hot and dry areas across the state. This shrub like perennial has a very loose, lanky growth habit that resist forming any uniformed shape as it matures, encouraging regular pruning but can manage fine without.

Small five-petal flowers are no more than one inch across, appearing in the early summer and lasting till fall. The woody base and roots can be protected by winter freezing and death with a healthy layer of mulch. No real pest or disease problems.

Member of the Plants for Texas program


Pear, Bradford

Pear, Bradford

Botanical Name: Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford'

The Bradford Pear is a popular ornamental tree known for its spring blooms and fall color. ‘Bradford’ differs from the others in that it’s fast growing, forming a natural round to teardrop shape.  It’s popular in cities as it tolerates many soil types, air pollution, and drought.

White flowers cover the tree in the late winter; they are no more than one inch in diameter and borne in clusters, averaging a dozen each -- flower show is best after a cold winter. Leaves begin to emerge as the flowers drop; simple ovate leaves roughly 3 inches long, which turn vibrant shades of red, purple, and orange in the fall. The leaves will hold onto the tree longer nearly till frost – that’s longer than other deciduous tree.

Bradford Pear does not produce any edible or ornamental pears -- they are roughly half an inch in diameter and difficult to notice. Although popular and easy to find in many nurseries, Bradford normally won’t live past 25 years due to the compact branching leading to broken limbs past starting at 15 years of age. 


Persimmon, Texas

Persimmon, Texas

Botanical Name: Diospyros texana

Outstanding Texas native found in the rocky limestone areas from west to east texas; Texas Persimmon is a small tree with an irregular growth habit, known for its tolerance to pretty much most of Texas in terms of environment, weather, and pest.

The trunk has smooth, light gray bark; as it matures, it peels off in slightly brittle patches displaying fresh bark with shades of white, grey, and pink. Leaves are only up to two inches in length, light to dark green and slightly rolled downward on the sides.

Flowers are borne only on female Persimmon trees, never more than a half-inch wide and bell shaped. They appear in clusters on new growth in March to April, then form small one inch wide green fruits that turn black and ripen in September. Although they are edible, they do well in attracting wildlife; they also stain clothes and desk easily so avoid planting in foot paths.  


Petunia

Petunia

Botanical Name: Petunia hybrida

We carry Wave Petunias and Carpet Petunias, Wave being our favorite; they can get 12-15" wide with a prostrate habit, while Carpet Petunias only get 10-12" wide and tall. Colors range in purple, lavender, white, pink, and red. It's also possible they die back in a light winter, only to return in the spring.

 

Spring 2011 Cultivars
Carpet Blue
Carpet Bright Red
Carpet Pink
Carpet Plum
Carpet Rose
Carpet Velvet
Carpet White

 


Philodendron, Split Leaf

Philodendron, Split Leaf

Botanical Name: Philodendron selloum

This tropical Brazilian native is semi-hardy for southern Texas; with large glossy leaves growing off a large unbranching stem that sprawls along the ground. The leaves are up to three feet in length, dissected into many large lobes with slight ruffles. It will reach heights of ten feet in warm climates, or dies back in colder only to return if protected sufficiently.

The bloom isn’t really noticeable; it emerges from the base only one foot in height, a modified leaf with a hood, with a club-shaped base in the middle being the flower.

Philodendron appreciates moist, well drained soils and does not tolerate drought conditions at all. It should be placed in the landscape with consideration of the directly the stem can grow. 


Photinia x fraseri

Photinia x fraseri

Botanical Name: Photinia x fraseri

Red Tip Photinia is a popular, fast growing, evergreen shrub commonly used as a screen or large hedge, reaching 15 feet tall and wide.  Fraseri has some tolerance to leaf spot and mildew, and is best grown in well ventilated sunny areas.

Large white blooms in the spring are only one of the visual aesthetics; rich bronze-red new foliage emerges from the branch tips, giving the Photinia the nickname "Redtip Photinia". They eventually turn a handsome green a month later, but new foliage will continue to slowly emerge through the summer. Easily pruned into hedges, topiaries, or even tree forms.

Photinia is drought tolerant once established, but it is in no way deer tolerate – it ranks pretty high on the deer’s favorite menu item right after Hawthorns. 


Pistache, Chinese

Pistache, Chinese

Botanical Name: Pistacia chinensis

A tough and durable tree that has found itself thriving in the Texas environment. Although it appreciates regular watering, it tolerates poor and dry soils and can be found growing wild in various parts of East Texas.

Chinese Pistache doesn’t grow uniformed when young, so minimal pruning is appreciated to help it along to when it’s several years old and develops a large, round oval top. At roughly ten years of age, female plants will set large clusters of red to pale green blooms early in the spring before foliage emerges. After the leaves emerge, small blue fruits begin to turn red, attracting birds easily as they mature in the fall.

The real value of the Pistache comes in the fall, when the foliage turns excellent shades of red, yellow, and orange, persisting for weeks until falling. It’s not uncommon for the female plants to continue having seeds on the tree after leaves have already fallen, providing yet more winter color. 


Pittosporum, Dwarf

Pittosporum, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Pittosporum tobira 'Wheelers Dwarf'

A popular broadleaf evergreen shrub native to China and Japan, the “Wheelers Dwarf” Pittosporum is a broadleaf evergreen shrub that is ideal for small areas as it only gets three feet tall and wide. It looks dense thanks to the leaves being whorled around the branches with a slight recurve. They are leathery to the touch, and glossy on the top while dull on underside. “Wheelers Dwarf” is considerably much slower growing, and has less tolerance to freezing temperatures.

Small fragrant white flowers are only half an inch in diameter and appear early in the spring, then slowly turn yellow as they progress into the summer.  They are followed by smaller  fruits in the late summer, not really noticeable.  

Pittosporum appreciates well drained soil, and regular watering and fertilization promotes thick, even growth. In a drought, it suffers more than regular pittosporum and will look rough till more optimal conditions return.   


Pittosporum, Green

Pittosporum, Green

Botanical Name: Pittosporum tobira

A popular broadleaf evergreen shrub native to China and Japan, Pittosporum is a broadleaf evergreen shrub that gets very tall and open in full sun, or remains compact and full in the shade. Normally growing as tall as it gets wide, Pittosporum forms an upright round head, looking dense thanks to the leaves being whorled around the branches with a slight recurve. They are leathery to the touch, and glossy on the top while dull on underside.

Small fragrant white flowers are only half an inch in diameter and appear early in the spring, then slowly turn yellow as they progress into the summer.  They are followed by stiff small fruits in the late summer, not overly noticeable against the foliage.

Pittosporum appreciates well drained soil, and regular watering and fertilization promotes thick, even growth. In a drought, the plant grows more loose and open, almost ragged, but recovers quickly when the water returns. 


Pittosporum, Variegated

Pittosporum, Variegated

Botanical Name: Pittosporum tobira 'Variegata'

A popular broadleaf evergreen shrub native to China and Japan, Pittosporum is a broadleaf evergreen shrub that gets very tall and open in full sun, or remains compact and full in the shade. Normally growing as tall as it gets wide, Pittosporum forms an upright round head, looking dense thanks to the leaves being whorled around the branches with a slight recurve. They are leathery to the touch, and glossy on the top while dull on underside. ‘Variegata’ is a variegated cultivar with grey-green leaves with cream colored margins. It’s not uncommon for some variegated Pittosporums to revert back to their green leaves; simply trim off those branches.

Small fragrant white flowers are only half an inch in diameter and appear early in the spring, then slowly turn yellow as they progress into the summer.  They are followed by stiff small fruits in the late summer, not overly noticeable against the foliage.

Pittosporum appreciates well drained soil, and regular watering and fertilization promotes thick, even growth. In a drought, the plant grows more loose and open, almost ragged, but recovers quickly when the water returns. 


Plum, Mexican

Plum, Mexican

Botanical Name: Prunus mexicana

Texas native tree ideal as a full sun specimen in the landscape, or as an understory for shaded areas. It tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, and is highly drought tolerant once established. Grows primarily as a single truck tree, allowing landscaping underneath with perennials or annual color.

Copious amounts of small white blooms cover the tree in the early spring, persisting for a couple weeks before foliage begins to emerge. The leaves are light green, up to five inches long and are folded over in such a way you think the tree is always in need of water. Plums start developing after the flowers drop, turning yellow-green to purple as they ripen into the fall. Although they are edible, the plums are often used to make jellies or jams. In colder climates, the leaves will turn shades of orange, yellow, and red before falling.

Young trees have a smooth, gray bark. As it grows, it turns darker in color, begins to peel off in patches, turning deep and furrowed in older age. Mexican plum is extremelly low maintenace, demanding very little attention for giving back such a gorgeous spring display. 


Plumbago

Plumbago

Botanical Name: Plumbago auriculata
Perennial best known for its large clusters of blue flowers spring to fall. Easily spreads up to five feet wide while reaching three feet tall.

Plumbago, Dwarf

Plumbago, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
This dwarf species looks almost nothing like regular Plumbago. The dark green leaves contrast the deep blue flowers that do not form large balls of flowers, but are loosly borne with only a few others at the ends of branches. Low growing perennial reaching only 15 inches high and wide, however spreads by underground rhizomes to become an attractive groundcover. Only slighly invasive with no serious pest or disease problems. Will die easily in poorly drained soils or from over-watering, and grows best with full sun in the morning and part shade in the heat of the afternoon.

Pride of Barbados

Pride of Barbados

Botanical Name: Caesalpinia pulcherrima

Known also as the Peacock Tree or Mexican Bird of Paradise, Pride of Barbados is native to the West Indies. An annual in north Texas, perennial in central to south, it reaches average heights of six feel tall in a growing season. It has a very open, spreading habit, multiple branches with small thorns so avoid planting directly on walking paths.

The bright green bipinnately compound leaves are very light, almost fern-link with leaflets no longer than three-quarters of an inch. It turns reddish yellow in the fall before dropping. Starting in the spring, large panicles of bright red, orange, and yellow blooms with long red stamens appear on the terminal ends of the branches. They continue to appear till fall, and are followed by seed pods no more than three inches long that dry over winter and split open, releasing the seeds.

Pride of Barbados requires easily drained soils, and can grow in acidic or alkaline areas. Mulch heavily to ensure protection from death in colder areas. Prune dead branches, or bring down to a manageable size in the late winter.