Shrubs, trees, ground covers, native plants, and seasonal color

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Click on any of the alpha indexes below to view the corresponding lists of plants.

The default list is displayed alphabetically by common name for all plant types. You can view the plants by clicking on the Scientific Name or limit the plant type by using the drop down.

Plants actively being grown for the current season are shown -- selecting Discontinued Items will show plants we have offered in the past. 

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Include:  Discontinued Items
Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Redbud, Mexican

Redbud, Mexican

Botanical Name: Cercis reniformis 'Mexican'

A Texas native redbud native that is a smaller, more manageable sized Redbud for the average landscape -- staying under 20 feet in height and width. Although it naturally is a multi-trunk small tree, they are often pruned to be single trunk. It thrives in fertile soil with regular watering, but it’s drought and heat tolerant, more so than the Eastern Redbud.  One of the most drought tolerant redbuds available.

Clusters of rosey-pink flowers appear in the late winter to early spring before foliage, and continue for a couple weeks as the leaves begin to emerge. The seed pods are flat, brown and can be up to four inches long, persisting into the winter after leaves drop. The waxy, glossy green leaves are smaller than Texas or Oklahoma Redbud, and are extremely wavy around the edges.  


Redbud, Oklahoma

Redbud, Oklahoma

Botanical Name: Cercis reniformis 'Oklahoma'

A Redbud found in Oklahoma (of all places) native that is a smaller, more manageable sized Redbud for the average landscape -- staying under 20 feet in height and width. Although it naturally is a multi-trunk small tree, they are often pruned to be single trunk. It thrives in fertile soil with regular watering, but it’s drought and heat tolerant, more so than the Eastern Redbud.  It’s one of the most cold-hardy of the redbuds available.

Clusters of red-purple flowers appear in the late winter to early spring before foliage, and continue for a couple weeks as the leaves begin to emerge. The seed pods are flat, brown and can be up to four inches long, persisting into the winter after leaves drop. The waxy, glossy green leaves are heart shaped. 


Redbud, Texas

Redbud, Texas

Botanical Name: Cercis reniformis 'Texas'

A Texas native that is a smaller, more manageable sized Redbud for the average landscape -- staying under 20 feet in height and width. Although it naturally is a multi-trunk small tree, they are often pruned to be single trunk. It thrives in fertile soil with regular watering, but it’s drought and heat tolerant, more so than the Eastern Redbud. It is not as cold hardy as Oklahoma redbud, but faster growing.

Clusters of rose-purple flowers appear in the late winter to early spring before foliage, and continue for a couple weeks as the leaves begin to emerge. The seed pods are flat, reddish brown and can be up to four inches long, persisting into the winter after leaves drop. The waxy, glossy green leaves are heart shaped, with slightly waved edges. 


Retama Tree

Retama Tree

Botanical Name: Parkinsonia aculeata

A fast growing Texas native tree with beautiful long arching, somewhat drooping, branches with thorns at the nodes. Cast a very light shade due to the very small leaves along the stems. Complimented nicely with multitude of bright yellow flowers borne in the spring and continue into the fall. Seed pods up to six inches in length follow, and persist on the tree until next spring when they begin to fall to the ground.

Retama tree is highly drought tolerant once established, and has no serious pest or disease issues. 


Rose, Apricot Drift

Rose, Apricot Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meimirrote'

 


Rose, Belinda's Dream

Rose, Belinda's Dream

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Belinda's Dream'

Originally introduced in 1988, Belinda’s Dream is a cross between ‘Tiffany’ and ‘Jersey Beauty’. It is the first rose to receive both a Texas Superstar and Earthkind designation. It’s quite resistant to black spot, mildew, and rust when planted in full sun and highly ventilated areas.

The dark blue-green foliage is a handsome backdrop for the large heavy double blooms that emerge on new branches, and have a slight fragrance. They are often borne on long branches, making them ideal for cut arrangements.

The shrub maintains an upright growth habit, and is quite sturdy up to five feet in height. Prune heavily in the late winter before spring to encourage heavy bloom set.  


Rose, Coral Drift

Rose, Coral Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meidrifora'

 Coral Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/599/index.htm


Rose, Icy Drift

Rose, Icy Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meipicdevoj'

Icy Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/1485/index.htm


Rose, Knock Out

Rose, Knock Out

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Radrazz'

Originally developed by William Radler, Conard Pyle holds the patent on one of the most popular line of roses that have reinvigorated roses for the Texas landscapes – the Knock Out Roses. The original of several cultivars, ‘Radrazz’ Knock Out Rose is highly resistant to diseases that plague other roses, while being very tolerant of hot and dry climates familiar to Texas. Since introduction, it has become the fastest selling new rose of all time.

The single blooms are a deep red cherry color, and appear abundantly in the late winter for a week or two, then drop off only to continue blooming again throughout the summer until first real frost. To maximize the amount of blooms, trimming the shrub midwinter will encourage more branches to fill out the plant, thus more blooms.  The foliage is a dark purple hue as it emerges, turning dark green for the summer. In the fall it turns a dark burgundy.

Won the All-America Rose award in 2000 when introduced, and Texas Superstar in 2004; Knockout has become a commonplace addition to any landscape since.  


Rose, Mutabilis

Rose, Mutabilis

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Mutabilis'

The Chinese Rose has many hybrids available, many that can be traced to their origins; Mutabilis’ origins are unknown, first appearing in 1896 in Italy. It was labeled “Earthkind Rose of the Year” by the Texas Cooperative Extension in 2005.

Its popularity is owed to the single (5 petal) blooms that open copper-yellow, then changing to pink, then finally crimson before dropping off all within a 36-hour timeframe. It’s common to see this rose bushy covered in blooms with all three colors at once any time from spring to fall. The petals are delicate, often curved and flowing in the slightest of wind, giving the impression of butterflies covering the bush.

Mutabilis is a vigorous grower, with a very lose and open growth habit, but will stay relatively the same height and width on its own. Pruning will help maintain its shape, but don’t expect it to make a thick, tight hedge without regular maintenance.

Like any rose, Mutabilis requires soil with good drainage – otherwise can tolerate soil that is acidic or alkaline. Once established it can be very drought and heat tolerant with very few pest problems. 


Rose, Nacogdoches

Rose, Nacogdoches

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Nacogdoches'

Alternatively known as "Grandma's Yellow", Nacogdoches Rose is the 2009 "Yellow Rose of Texas", a Texas Superstar

Nacogdoches Rose is a spectacular landscape addition, due to the blooming period starting in late winter and continuing till the next freeze. Wild temperature fluctuations will cause it to stop blooming, but only for a short time. The flowers are a rich shade of yellow, and can have up to 25 petals. They stand out nicely against the dark green leaves. 

Provide adequate drainage, and Nacogdoches Rose can grow in acidic or alkaline soils. 


Rose, Nearly Wild

Rose, Nearly Wild

Botanical Name: Rosa x Nearly Wild

An excellent barrier shrub due to the stiff branches covered in a multitude of thorns. Only grows an average of three feet tall and wide, but covers itself in simple pink blooms as early as spring and continuing into fall.


Best grown in a sunny open area to discourage black spot and powdery mildew.


Rose, Peach Drift

Rose, Peach Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meiggili'

Peach Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/596/index.htm


Rose, Pink Drift

Rose, Pink Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meijocos'

Pink Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/597/index.htm


Rose, Red Drift

Rose, Red Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meigalpio'

Red Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/598/index.htm


Rose, Sweet Drift

Rose, Sweet Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meiswetdom'

Sweet Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/968/index.htm


Rosemary, Weeping

Rosemary, Weeping

Botanical Name: Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus'

A Mediterranean native that is no stranger to hot and dry conditions on top of rocky soils. The highly aromatic needle-like leaves are complimented in the late winter with small blue flowers, no more than one inch in diameter and somewhat tubular. The weeping rosemary is an excellent choice for raised beds, where the leaves can drape over and cover the wall. 

Rosemary requires well-drained alkaline soils, otherwise will be easily prone to disease and dieback when overwatered. No matter the location in the landscape, full sun must be provided. The foliage is commonly used in cooking, aroma therapy, and for medicinal purposes. 


Ruellia, Katie Mexican Petunia

Ruellia, Katie Mexican Petunia

Botanical Name: Ruellia x brittoniana 'Katie'

Dwarf cultivar of Ruellia that grows very quickly, spreading quickly through reseeding. Delicate looking trumpet flowers are a blue-purple hue, and at the top of the plant borne in clusters up to three. They start to appear in late spring, and continue till fall.

Highly drought and heat tolerant, and can become invasive if used in small areas.

 


Russelia, Red

Russelia, Red

Botanical Name: Russelia sp.

Native to Mexico, this fast growing small shrub has long slender branches that grow up to four feet tall, then easily cascade over making it ideal for raised flowerbeds. The wirey leaves on the branches are mixed in with clusters of flowers that first appear in the spring and persist till fall. The blooms are one inch in length, red-scarlet and narrow till the end where they open up - resembling small fire crackers.

Firecracker plant appreciates regular watering and fertilizer, however can continue to bloom through the dry summer. Easily attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.