Shrubs, trees, ground covers, native plants, and seasonal color

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Click on any of the alpha indexes below to view the corresponding lists of plants. The default list is displayed alphabetically by common name for all plant types. You can view the plants by clicking on the Scientific Name or limit the plant type by using the drop down.

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Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Abelia, Edward Goucher

Abelia, Edward Goucher

Botanical Name: Abelia x grandiflora 'Edward Goucher'

Edward Goucher is a cross between Abelia x grandiflora and Abelia schumannii. A moderately fast growing shrub with a natural round growth habit, rarely seen growing over four feet in height and width.

An excellent choice for a small hedge or border that responds well to pruning; pink blooms appear only on new growth from spring to frost. Planting in full sun provides for best flowering, however it can still provide some color when grown in filtered shade. New foliage is purple, turning green through the summer, then bronze-green in the fall.

 Edward Goucher has very few pest problems and maintenance free. Fertilizer is best applied in late winter.


Agarita, Texas

Agarita, Texas

Botanical Name: Berberis (or Mahonia) trifoliolata

Small Texas native shrub that makes an excellent border or barrier plant due to the sharply pointed tri-leaflet leaves. The branches are stiff and spread out in every direction, reaching no more than several feet, easily forming small thickets.

Clusters of fragrant yellow flowers appear in the late winter, lasting until spring and are quite attractive against the gray-green holy-like leaves. They are followed by orange-red drupe fruits that wildlife seek out. They are easily harvested by pushing a sheet under the branches and lightly striking the bush with a broom; they are used to make jelly.

If given good drainage, Agarita can adapt to any soil type, and is naturally heat and drought tolerant. 


Alyssum, Sweet

Alyssum, Sweet

Botanical Name: Lobularia maritima
Popular bedding plant that is great for edgings and borders. Blooms start in early spring and continue to frost. Fragrant flowers can be white, pink, rose or purple. Generally pest free. Spring and Summer Annual Fall 2008 Cultivar Easter Bonnet Violet Easter Bonnet White

Anacacho Orchid Tree

Anacacho Orchid Tree

Botanical Name: Bauhinia lunarioides

The Anacacho Orchid tree is native to Mexico and south-western regions of Texas.  A large shrub or small tree with an irregular growth pattern.

The distinctive gray-green leaves are slightly cleft, and drop only when temperatures drop into the 30s. The foliage cover is thicker when grown in full sun. Clusters of pale pink to white flowers emerge on the new growth in the spring, lasting roughly a month. The flowers look like those of orchids, giving the shrub its name.  Bees and butterflies are readily attracted to the blooms.

The Anacacho Orchid tree is low maintenance and tolerant of hot and dry conditions, but required adequately drained soils. 


Anacua

Anacua

Botanical Name: Ehretia anacua

South Texas native that is evergreen south of San Antonio due to the light winters, but semi-evergreen anywhere else. It is also called the Sandpaper Tree due to the rough texture of the leaves. 

Ideal flowering tree for alkaline areas, however it will tolerate acidic soils. Desired for its showy and fragrant start shaped flowers that appear in the spring throughout summer. It develops clusters of orange fruits in July that attract wildlife in the fall. 

Anacua naturally develops several trunks, often forming a twisted gnarling shape as it ages. Relatively pest and disease free. 


Aralia, Fatsia, or Glossy Leaf Paper Plant

Aralia, Fatsia, or Glossy Leaf Paper Plant

Botanical Name: Fatsia japonica

Native to Japan, Aralia is one of the few plants appreciated for its leaves over the blooms. The leaves are palmately lobed and average twelve inches wide, located on the end of petioles that can be up to three feet long. “Fatsia” is Japanese for the number eight, as the leaves typically have eight lobes.

The thick stems of Aralia can’t always bear the weight of the leaves -- they may bend to the side, eventually resting on the ground and prominently displaying the old leaf scars. Small white flowers are borne from the top of the stem in the early winter, sometimes unnoticed against the foliage.

Aralia requires moist soils, and appreciates it slightly acidic. Freezing temperatures can damage the entire plant, so mulch well and plant in a protected area anywhere in cold regions of Texas. 


Aster, Fall

Aster, Fall

Botanical Name: Aster x frikartii
A perennial with regular green foliage that doesn't contribute much to the spring and summer flower beds, but in the fall covers itself in daisy-like blue flowers that stay for weeks. Grows three feet tall and expands its width by runners. Regular watering will promote better blooms in fall.

Bat Faced Cuphea

Bat Faced Cuphea

Botanical Name: Cuphea llavea

Small mounding perennial native to Mexico that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies easily. Produces a multitude of 1" red tubular flowers with purple throats open at the end with small patterns of a bat (hence the name)

Member of Plants for Texas Program


Begonia

Begonia

Botanical Name: Begonia x semperflorens-cultorum

Popular bedding plant that forms a bushy mound with foliage color ranging from green, green & white, red, and bronze. Flowers all season in red, pink, or white. Will not tolerate over-wet conditions.

 

Bronze and Red Leaf begonias are best in full sun, while the green leafed ones do best in shaded areas.

2011 Spring Cultivars

Cocktail Gin
Cocktail Vodka
Cocktail Whiskey
Nightlife Red
Nightlife Rose
Nightlife White
Olympia Super Red 


Black Foot Daisy

Black Foot Daisy

Botanical Name: Melampodium leucanthum

Texas native mounding perennial with an abundance of small white flowers throughout the warm season. Grows up to twelve inches tall and wide. Easily self propigates by seed becoming a massing in a couple years.
 
The white flower petals surround a small yellow senter, reaching only one inch total in width. Attracts bees, butterflies, and birds easily. Must be provided well draining soils; blooms best in full sun.


Blue Dawnflower

Blue Dawnflower

Botanical Name: Ipomoea acuminata

Fast growing perennial vine with striking blue flowers that average four inches across; blooms appear from spring to fall. The vine extends up to 15 feet in length until fall, when they die back in even the mildest of winters.

Dawnflower is an ideal specimen for a trellis or fence where the vines and leaves will weave through it quickly, then give a gorgeous floral display. Although Dawnflower is hardy to zone 9, heavy mulching will help it return in the spring.


Blue Daze

Blue Daze

Botanical Name: Evolvulu glomeratus 'Blue Daze'

Herbaceous perennial with pubescent gray-green leaves and one inch wide blue flowers appearing from late spring to the first frost. Grows up to three feet tall and spreads by self propagation easily.

Blue Daze is great for the Texas heat, however in central to north Texas it will be an annual. Tolerates salt water well, making it ideal in coastal areas as long as it's planted in sandy soils, as inadequate drainage will promote fungus, killing it easily. Native to Brazil.


Bottlebrush

Bottlebrush

Botanical Name: Callistemon citrinus

From the land down under comes this spectacular blooming tree that prefers the warmer areas of southern Texas. The Bottlebrush is also called the Lemon Bottlebrush for the citrus aroma the leaves have when crushed.

This low maintenance tree has a medium to medium fast growth habit (depending on regularity of water and fertilization) with flexible upright stems that droop under their own weight as they lengthen. The narrow lance-shaped leaves have a leathery touch to them, and are slightly tomentose on the underside. Bright red fuzzy flowers are on the stem tips, arranged radially and being entirely composed of stamens giving it the look of a large bottlebrush; they appear in abundance during the spring and sporadically throughout the summer.  

 It prefers well drained loose soils that are slightly acidic, and requires mulching in areas that experience cold winters.  Freeze damaged branches can be trimmed back to the main trunk or ground, where it will rebound in the spring. Easily attracts butterflies and hummingbirds when in bloom. 


Bottlebrush, Dwarf

Bottlebrush, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Callistemon citrinus 'Little John'

From the land down under comes this spectacular blooming tree that prefers the warmer areas of southern Texas. The Bottlebrush is also called the Lemon Bottlebrush for the citrus aroma the leaves have when crushed.

This low maintenance tree has a slow growth habit, with stiff stems that spread up and outright more than downward. The narrow lance-shaped leaves have a leathery touch to them, and are slightly tomentose on the underside. Bright red fuzzy flowers are on the stem tips, arranged radially and being entirely composed of stamens giving it the look of a large bottlebrush; they appear in abundance during the spring and sporadically throughout the summer.  

‘Little John’ is a dwarf cultivar, with a more compact growth habit and higher susceptibility to freezing temperatures.  It prefers well drained loose soils that are slightly acidic, and requires mulching in areas that experience cold winters.  Easily attracts butterflies and hummingbirds when in bloom. 


Bougainvillea

Bougainvillea

Botanical Name: Bougainvillea x 'Red Barbara Karst'

Bougainvillea is one of the most captivating blooming vines used around Texas. Native to South America, these thorny woody vines grow up to 30 feet long in warm climates; semi-evergreens that drop their leaves in colder climates. Popular in hanging baskets or containers so that they can be protected in the colder regions as freezing temperatures can kill them.

The flowers themselves are small and white, however they are surrounded by multiple bracts that are papery feeling to the touch available in variety of colors, from white, pink, peach, reds. Relatively pest-free plants, with best flowering occurring when roots are crowded, making them ideal for container planting. Watering less also induces more flowering, but don't starve it. Bougainvillea thrives on regular fertilization and tolerates short periods of droughts.


Bougainvillea

Bougainvillea

Botanical Name: Bougainvillea x 'Variegated Vickie'

Bougainvillea is one of the most captivating blooming vines used around Texas. Native to South America, these thorny woody vines grow up to 30 feet long in warm climates; semi-evergreens that drop their leaves in colder climates. Popular in hanging baskets or containers so that they can be protected in the colder regions as freezing temperatures can kill them.

The flowers themselves are small and white, however they are surrounded by multiple bracts that are papery feeling to the touch available in variety of colors, from white, pink, peach, reds. Relatively pest-free plants, with best flowering occurring when roots are crowded, making them ideal for container planting. Watering less also induces more flowering, but don't starve it. Bougainvillea thrives on regular fertilization and tolerates short periods of droughts.


Boxwood, Japanese

Boxwood, Japanese

Botanical Name: Buxus microphylla 'Japonica'

This Japanese native shrub is no stranger to the landscape, as it’s often the plant of choice for trimmed hedges, topiaries, and bonsai sculptures. Japanese Boxwood is an evergreen shrub with a multiple branching habit – combined with the dense growth habit of the leaves it naturally forms a thick round form. The glossy bright green leaves that only grow an inch give it a very uniformed feel when regularly trimmed or pruned.

There are no noticeable flower or fruit characteristics. It’s important that the ground it is planted in has adequate drainage to avoid root rot; roots tend to stay shallow, so a thick layer of mulch can help maintain moisture. Appreciates morning sun and light, filtered afternoon shade. 


Boxwood, Wintergem

Boxwood, Wintergem

Botanical Name: Buxus microphylla 'Winter Gem'

This Japanese native shrub is no stranger to the landscape, as it’s often the plant of choice for trimmed hedges, topiaries, and bonsai sculptures.  Japanese Boxwood is an evergreen shrub with a multiple branching habit – combined with the dense growth habit of the leaves it naturally forms a thick round form. “Winter Gem” has glossy dark green leaves that only grown an inch give it a much uniformed feel when regularly trimmed or pruned.

There are no noticeable flower or fruit characteristics. It’s important that the ground it is planted in has adequate drainage to avoid root rot; roots tend to stay shallow, so a thick layer of mulch can help maintain moisture. Appreciates morning sun and light, filtered afternoon shade. 


Bulbine

Bulbine

Botanical Name: Bulbine frutescens

South African native herbaceous perennial ideal for hot and dry Texas landscapes.  Displays racemes of orange-yellow flowers throughout the warm months and spreads easily through the rhizome offsets and seeds. Grows best in well-drained soils, pest and maintenance free.

Member of Plants for Texas Program


Bush Daisy

Bush Daisy

Botanical Name: Euryops pectinatus
Evergreen shrub-forming perennial that grows up to six feet tall and four feet wide. Gray-green to green foliage is complimented by the yellow daisy-like flowers that persist until winter.

Bush Germander

Bush Germander

Botanical Name: Teucrium fruticans

Information coming soon - new introduction!


Butterfly Vine

Butterfly Vine

Botanical Name: Stigmaphyllon ciliatum

A vigorous evergreen vine native to the tropical regions of South America that has adapted well in the southern Texas landscape. The vine easily spreads up to 15 feet, however if the stems touch ground, they sprout roots, allowing them to spread even further. Climbs most surfaces with ease, but does best with trellises or fences.

Intense yellow blooms that look like small orchids appear early in the summer and continue to appear till fall. Papery samara fruits form after flowering that resemble large butterfly wings, giving this vine its name.

Mulch heavily in the winter as it is vulnerable to freezing temperatures and protects it through the heat of the summer.


Caladium

Caladium

Botanical Name: Caladium x

Popular perennial (grown as annuals ) known for the colorful heart-shaped leaves available in several colors with many variations with streaks, spots, and patterns. Strap leaf varieties are appropriate for afternoon sun while fancy varieties need to remain in the shade. Caladiums row 24 inches tall and wide.

 Well drained soil is appreciated, and exposure depends on the variety; strap leaf varieties can tolerate afternoon sun, while fancy leaf varieties must remain in afternoon shade. Regular watering is required during growing season, however in the winter when the plant dies back to the tubers soil should be kept dry.

Sun Tolerant Varieties for 2011 :

Florida Sweetheart
White Wing


Caladium

Caladium

Botanical Name: Caladium x

Popular perennial (grown as annuals) known for the colorful heart-shaped leaves available in several colors with many variations with streaks, spots, and patterns. Strap leaf varieties are appropriate for afternoon sun while fancy varieties need to remain in the shade. Caladiums row 24 inches tall and wide.

 Well drained soil is appreciated, and exposure depends on the variety; strap leaf varieties can tolerate afternoon sun, while fancy leaf varieties must remain in afternoon shade. Regular watering is required during growing season, however in the winter when the plant dies back to the tubers soil should be kept dry.

Shade Only Caladiums for 2010 :

Carolyn Whorton
Arno Nehrling
Candidum

 


Cast Iron,

Cast Iron,

Botanical Name: Aspidistra elatior

Amongst all the landscape plant offerings, Cast Iron stands out as the one plant without stems or a trunk. It is a perennial with leathery tough leaves that emerge directly from the underground rhizome,  reaching a mature height of three feet. It earned its name for the ability to grow in low-light areas combined with minimal care or maintenance.  It makes an ideal indoor plant due to its hardy nature.

Aspidistra is unfortunately extremely slow growing, taking over a year to completely fill out a simple small gallon size container pot. Inconspicuous small purple flowers appear at the base of the plant in the spring. A variegated cultivar exists that has white markings streaked vertically on the leaves. 

Be sure to grow in well-draining soils to prevent root-rot. 


Cherry Laurel, Compact

Cherry Laurel, Compact

Botanical Name: Prunus caroliniana 'Compacta'

The Cherry Laurel species is native to East Texas where it thrives with the regular rainfall and acidic soils. It tolerates heat, drought, and wind so well, that it is utilized nearly anywhere Texas. 

‘Compacta’ is a cultivar with more compact growth habit, smaller leaf size, and a maturing at half the size of the regular Cherry Laurel. The small bright-green leaves have the odor of maraschino cherries when crushed, and are toxic. Fragrant white flowers cover the branches in the early spring, easily attracting butterflies and bees. They are followed by small black cherry fruits that only wildlife can enjoy, as they are poisonous to us as well.

Compact Cherry Laurel responds well to pruning, and often is sheared into cone shapes to keep its compact form.  


Coleus, Mixed

Coleus, Mixed

Botanical Name: Coleus x

Popular fast growing bedding plant for the summer that does best in filtered to full shade.

Attractive foliage is opposite and simple, ovate leaves. Come in shades of yellow, dull red, purple, and pale green. Flowers are dark blue to cream, displayed in terminal spike-like racemes that reach three inches long.

Coleus needs loose, well drained fertile soil, and does well as an underplanting. Mealy bugs are a problem when grown in full shade, and frequent trimming will ensure a thick bushy plant.

2010 Spring - Summer Cultivars :

Burgundy Sun
Dipt in Wine
Fishnet Stockings
Floridasun Jade
Floridasun Rose
Pineapple
Red Coat
Magilla
Wizard Mix
Wizard Mosaic


Columbine

Columbine

Botanical Name: Aquilegia hinckleyana 'Texas Gold'
Fern-like perennial that forms a soft mound, with attractive flowers in spring and sporadically throughout summer. Bright yellow blooms appear on long branches that grow above the plant, with long spurs in the back. Prefers constant moisture, reseeds very easily and becomes unsightly with age – easily removed and make room for the newer plants that germinated. Subject to aphids, leafminers, and spider mites in dry climates, and will go dormant in hot dry summers before it normally does in winter.

Copper Canyon Daisy

Copper Canyon Daisy

Botanical Name: Tagetes lemmonii

Bushy perennial that heavily covers itself with yellow daisy-like blooms in the spring and fall, and intermittently during the summer. Great tolerance to hot and dry areas. Grows up to six feet tall and four feet wide, but can get weedy-looking and will recover quickly from pruning in the warm seasons. Foliage has a bitter aroma.


Member of Plants for Texas Program


Coral Plant

Coral Plant

Botanical Name: Russelia equisetaformis

Native to Mexico, this fast growing small shrub has long slender branches that grow up to four feet tall, then easily cascade over making it ideal for raised flowerbeds. The wirey leaves on the branches are mixed in with clusters of flowers that first appear in the spring and persist till fall. The blooms are one inch in length, red-scarlet and narrow till the end where they open up - resembling small fire crackers.

Firecracker plant appreciates regular watering and fertilizer, however can continue to bloom through the dry summer. Easily attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.

 


Cotoneaster, Grayleaf

Cotoneaster, Grayleaf

Botanical Name: Cotoneaster glaucophyllus

Often mispronounced as the two separate words Coton and Easter, Cotoneaster is one of the more durable and hardy landscape shrubs for the Texas landscape. It tolerates urban conditions, poor soils, and even drought – but thrives when given favorable care.

It has an appealing shade of gray-green foliage that is slightly pubescent, arranged on low arching branches that somewhat form a thicket. The small leaves and compact form allow to be pruned into thick hedges easily. Clusters of small white flowers appear on the branches throughout the spring, and are followed by red berries that persist throughout the fall. 


Crape Myrtle, Basham

Crape Myrtle, Basham

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Basham'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Basham' is a large growing cultivar with light pink blooms; it is a powdery mildew resistant cultivar. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds. 

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Catawba

Crape Myrtle, Catawba

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Catawba'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Catawba' is a medium sized tree, with a fine rich purple bloom color. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Dynamite

Crape Myrtle, Dynamite

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Dynamite'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Natchez

Crape Myrtle, Natchez

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Natchez'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Natchez' is a large cultivar, one of the largest available, with bright white blooms. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Pink Velour

Crape Myrtle, Pink Velour

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Pink Velour'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Pink Velour has burgundy-green leaves that get dark red-bronze in the fall, with pink blooms. Powdery Mildew resistant cultivar.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Red

Crape Myrtle, Red

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Red Rocket

Crape Myrtle, Red Rocket

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Red Rocket'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Red Rocket' is an improved powdery mildew resistance cultivar with rich red blooms.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Tuscarora

Crape Myrtle, Tuscarora

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Tuscarora'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Tuscarora' is an improved powdery mildew resistance cultivar with light red blooms, often used in leu of Watermelon Red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, White

Crape Myrtle, White

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crossvine

Crossvine

Botanical Name: Bignonia capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty'

A Texas native semi-evergreen vine that climbs fences, trellises, and trees easily with its small tendrils. It can reach lengths up to 40 feet, easily attracting hummingbirds and butterflies throughout the blooming season.

'Tangerine Beauty' is a cultivar reintroduced by J.C. Ralston of the University of North Carolina. The flowers are borne in clusters, each being pinkish-red with an orange-yellow throat. The bright green leaves turn an attractive red to purple hue in the winter after the first cold front. .

Crossvine is somewhat drought and poor soil tolerant, exhibiting no pest issues.


Cypress, Italian

Cypress, Italian

Botanical Name: Cupressus sempervirens

A species of cypress that is native to the Mediterranean which distinctively stands out with its very tall and narrow growth habit. It requires unique placement in any landscape, getting no more than a few feet wide yet up to 40 feet tall.

The erect branches do not branch far out from the main trunk, and have scale-like leaves produced off shoots of the branches. The dense, dark green leaves hold their color year round; in colder climates to the north the tree forms a narrow cone-shape. The seed cones are not readily visible when mixed in with the leaves.

Requires well drained soils, and appreciates regular watering and fertilization. 


Cypress, Montezuma

Cypress, Montezuma

Botanical Name: Taxodium mucronatum

Native to Mexico and the Rio Grande area of Texas, Montezuma Cypress is also known as Sabino or Ahuehuete; it is the national tree of Mexico. There is a specimen called “Tule” in Santa Maria that is estimated to be 2,000 years old.

Montezuma Cypress tree is an ideal substitute for the Bald Cypress, as it holds onto its leaves better during cold weather. In warmer areas of Southern Texas, it remains evergreen. Extremely versatile as it thrives in river beds and standing water, it tolerates drought like conditions anywhere in Texas.  When grown in standing water, it produces “knees” that are characteristic of the Taxodium cypresses.

They are often staked when cultivated in the nursery industry, as they are fast growing and the wood is weak when young. The branches have a natural weeping habit to them, and have pinnately arranged flat leaves that are needle-like, looking very delicate from a distance. The tree forms a broad spreading crown. The bark is brown to tan in color, with slight shredded-like exfoliation. 


Daylily, Stella De Oro

Daylily, Stella De Oro

Botanical Name: Hemerocallis X 'Stella De Oro'

Perennial that blooms throughout the spring and summer. Excellent for borders or massings. Stella De Oro has yellow flowers that only last one day, but are quickly replaced. Grows up to 12 inches tall and wide and returns in the spring; best grown in full sun.

Although capable to tolerant small periods of drought, regular watering will ensure regular blooming.


Dianthus

Dianthus

Botanical Name: Dianthus chinensis

Easy annual that does well in hot weather. Stiff upright stems that branch repeatedly, topped with flat clusters of single or double flowers in red, pink, white, or bicolors. No maintenance needed.

 

Spring 2011 Cultivars : 

Super Parfait Raspberry
Super Parfait Red Pepper
Super Parfait Strawberry


Elaeagnus or Silverbery

Elaeagnus or Silverbery

Botanical Name: Elaeagnus pungens

This Chinese / Japanese native shrub can be found in the in some of the most unfruitful places due to its tough and durable nature to grow just about anywhere in Texas.

This evergreen shrub sends out pointed branch stems from the base, often several feet before branching off or putting out new leaves. Leaves are oval shaped, up to four inches long and slightly wavy. They are green on top with brown scales, and lighter green with silver flecks on the bottom. They are not smooth to the touch, and hardly plain to look at. Bell shaped flowers in the fall are barely noticeable by sight, but easily acknowledged by the strong scent. The flowers turn to berries shortly after, and are food for birds early into the winter. 

Elaeagnus can be a nice, tightly trimmed hedge with a uniform shape, but will require constant pruning of the branches that emerge. It will grow in any soil condition except poorly drained soils, and tolerates heat and drought nearly like no other shrub.  


Elephant Ear

Elephant Ear

Botanical Name: Colocasia esculenta 'Black Magic'

Fast growing herbaceous perennial with heart-shaped leaves reaching up to 2-3 feet in length and 1-2 feet in width. Grows fine in standing water or poorly drained soils; responds very well to regular fertilization. Requires more water if grown in full sun. A gorgeous ornamental with many cultivars available on the market. 'Black Magic' cultivar has purplish-black leaves that turn a dullish green in the heat of the summer.

Colocasia dies back in colder climates and will return if the corms do not dry out.


Elephant Ear

Elephant Ear

Botanical Name: Colocasia esculenta

Fast growing herbaceous perennial with large heart-shaped leaves reaching up to 3-4 feet in length and 2-3 feet in width. Grows fine in standing water or poorly drained soils; responds very well to regular fertilization. Requires more water if grown in full sun. A gorgeous ornamental with many cultivars available on the market.

Colocasia dies back in colder climates and will return if the corms do not dry out.


Elm, Cedar

Elm, Cedar

Botanical Name: Ulmus crassifolia

Cedar Elm is the most common of the Texas native elms, and most resistant to Dutch Elm Disease. It’s found in East Texas, thriving in the deep rich soils along riverbanks and lakes. It is highly adaptable to dry and hot places throughout Texas and ideal for any landscape with adequate drainage.  

The coarse small green leaves emerge bright green, but mature to a darker green, turning yellow in the fall. They are up to two inches long with a coarse toothed margin on the edges. The branches have a flat cork ridge on both sides.  Red-brown to red-green flowers in the fall are not very noticeable, and are wind pollinated. The slightly hairy winged samara fruits are often abundant, and fall with the leaves in the winter.

The tree itself is maintenance free and tolerant of many adverse conditions, however be aware the seeds easily germinate; pulling up or mowing down saplings may become a regular chore. 


Esperanza, Dwarf

Esperanza, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Tecoma stans 'Nana'

Dwarf cultivar of the popular blooming perennial shrub native to Texas and Mexico. Bright green leaves are complimented with the multitude of yellow trumpet shape flowers appearing on the new growth from spring to fall. Esperanza is a tough and hardy plant ideal for any Texas landscape. It appreciates well-drained soils despite the quality it's grown in.

Pruning is not necessary till the first frost when the entire plant is killed back to the ground; good mulching will allow the roots to survive and return in the spring with vigor. In north Texas, it is treated as an annual.

Member of the Plants for Texas program.


Eve's Necklace

Eve's Necklace

Botanical Name: Sophora affinis

Eve’s Necklace is native to north-central Texas to the Edwards Plateau. It’s an ideal small tree for any landscape as it performs well as an understory or a small tree providing filtered shade to flower beds below. When grown in the shade, branches shoot upwards nearly vine line through other trees and shrubs in bid for sunlight. In full sun, it forms an irregular upright oval crown. It responds well to pruning, allowing the homeowner to guide the preferred shape.

Towards the middle of spring, fragrant cascading rose-pink flowers will hang in clusters for two to three weeks. They are followed by black seed pods, up to six inches long, that dry and persist into the winter. The seed pods give the plant its name, as they look like black beads on a string.

The pinnately compound leaves are slightly glossy green, but provide no fall color. The delicate foliage combined with the arching habit of the branches give the tree an overall fragile demeanor.  Once established, Eve’s necklace is drought tolerant and exhibits no pest or disease issues. 


Fern, Foxtail

Fern, Foxtail

Botanical Name: Asparagus sprengeri 'Meyerii'

Semi-hardy herbaceous perennial with arching, feather stems that form a dense frond with a open 'fluffy' look that resembles a fox's tail. Ideal for containers to relocate in the winter to protect from freezing temperatures. 

Small white flowers start to appear in the late spring and summer, followed by bright red berries with seeds instead of spores which disqualifies this plant as a true fern. 


Fern, Holly

Fern, Holly

Botanical Name: Cyrtomium falcatum

Evergreen fern that performs exceptionally well in acidic soils with good drainage and regular fertilization. Forms a rounded mound of glossy dark green leaves that unfurl and lay down slightly. The name comes from the holy-like leaves on the fronds. It tolerates sun better than other ferns, however the strong Texas heat combined with the sunlight will burn the foliage. 

Grows back easily after a heavy trimming when the foliage becomes sunburned or frayed - use caution not to cut into the crown. 


Fern, River

Fern, River

Botanical Name: Dryopteris normalis

Fast growing Texas native fern that demands moist, well drained acidic soils throughout the spring and summer. Semi-evergreen in warmer areas, but dies back to the roots completely if temperatures drop below freezing. Leaves are a light green hue, very graceful and delicate. Spreads easily by underground runners. 

Although it is drought tolerant, it dies back to the roots and will only return during wet conditions. Will outright die within twelve months if the conditions do not become favorable. 

 


Fern, Sprengeri

Fern, Sprengeri

Botanical Name: Asparagus densiflorus 'Sprengeri'

Open airy leaves and the light graceful form gave this plant it's name, however it is not a true fern as it self propagates by seeds and root stems. Small white flowers appear in the summer, followed by red berries that are enjoyed by birds.

Turns an unsightly shade of yellow in the heat of full sun, however maintains a healthy dark green in shade. 


Fig Tree

Fig Tree

Botanical Name: Ficus carica 'Celeste'

A popular fruit tree for Texas that grows well in the ground or in containers. The tree sap is milky and irritating to the skin. Not ideal for small landscapes, as it can feasilbly grow 40' feel tall and wide and block out sunlight to any plants under it.

Fig trees normally put out two crops - the Breba Crop and Main Crop. The Breba Crop is the first, with fruits appearing in the spring on last seasons' new growth. The Main Crop comes in the fall on that seasons' new growth.

Growth as mentioned can get quite overbearing, and loss of fruits is likely if pruned heavily.

Water young fig trees regularly till established. Thereafter, provide a deep watering every one or two weeks. Fig Trees benefit from heavy mulching, which retains the soil moisture.


Fig Vine

Fig Vine

Botanical Name: Ficus pumila

A vigorous growing vine native to East Asia that has found itself useful in the southern Texas landscapes.

Two types of leaves exist for the Fig Vine; the young leaves are small, no larger than one inch and are borne on young stems that do nothing more than climb any surface they touch. This, coupled with the vigorous growth habit allow Fig Vine to cover walls, trees, and even buildings relatively quickly and completely. Once the vine finds it has nothing left to climb, adult stems will emerge with larger, thicker leaves, and will also bear non-edible fig fruits.

Fig Vine is very tolerant of poor soil and heat. Harsh winters can kill the vine back; otherwise pruning it constantly to keep under control will be required. Be aware of the surfaces it will come into contact with, as it will damage wood fences and brick walls if forcefully removed. If you wish to remove Fig Vine with minimal damage, destroy the plant or stems at the base and allow the foliage to decompose naturally. 


Firebush

Firebush

Botanical Name: Hamelia patens

Central American native shrub that has adapted perfectly for central to south Texas.

Fast growing semi-evergreen shrub with very showy terminal clusters of red-orange tubular flowers that easily attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Small juicy red fruits in the fall attract birds.

Grows best in full sun; becomes uniniformed and blooms less in the shaded enviroments. Requires well drained soils, and performs best with regular watering but will tolerate drought conditions. An excellent perennial for central Texas, and annual to the north. No pest or disease problems.

A member of the Plants for Texas program.


Garlic (Society)

Garlic (Society)

Botanical Name: Tulbaghia violacea
Aromatic perennial with a strong garlic-onion fragrance. Purple blooms persist spring to fall, reaching up to three feet tall.

Grass, Dwarf Hameln

Grass, Dwarf Hameln

Botanical Name: Pennisetum alopecuroides 'Hameln'
Small perennial ornamental grass with a mounded growth habit. Growing only three feet tall and two feet wide. Dwarf Hameln grass has green-white flower plumes in fall.

Grass, Gulf Muhly

Grass, Gulf Muhly

Botanical Name: Muhlenbergia capillaris
Dwarf ornamental grass with very attractive pink-red flowers in the fall. Excellent in massings. Will grow back after a freeze and return in the spring.

Grass, Muhly

Grass, Muhly

Botanical Name: Muhlenbergia lindheimeri
Perennial semi-dwarf grass reaching to four feet tall and wide. Silver-white plumes in the fall are a striking display before receeding in a cold winter just to return in spring.

Grass, Pampas Dwarf

Grass, Pampas Dwarf

Botanical Name: Cortaderia selloana 'Pumila'
Dwarf cultivar of Pampas grass that reaches only five feet tall and wide. Large white flower plumes in the fall. Makes an excellent large barrier. Foliage is sharp, and can cut skin.

Grass, Purple Fountain

Grass, Purple Fountain

Botanical Name: Pennisetum setaceum 'Atrosanguineum'
Clumping perennial grass with outstanding purple foliage throught the warm season, and pinkish-purple flowers in the fall. Will die in a freeze; often treated as an annual.

Hawthorn, Clara

Hawthorn, Clara

Botanical Name: Raphiolepis indica 'Clara'

Native to southern China, Indian Hawthorn is a popular landscape shrub due to the natural ability to stay at a manageable size, spring blooms, and attractive berries in the fall. If there was any drawback to the hawthorns, it would be that deer prefer them to any other plant when dining in everyone’s backyard. ‘Clara’ forms a natural mound shape, no more than five feet tall.

Indian Hawthorn leaves are alternate and leathery to the touch, with serrated margins. ‘Clara’ is a cultivar with foliage emerging reddish-copper, turning dark green with age. The pink flower buds actually open white, no more than ¾” in diameter and appearing in clusters. Pome fruits that follow in the fall are dark purple to black, attracting birds.  

Hawthorns prefer well drained soils, and can tolerate poor quality soil and even drought once established. 


Hawthorn, Dwarf Pink

Hawthorn, Dwarf Pink

Botanical Name: Raphiolepis indica 'cv.'

Native to southern China, Indian Hawthorn is a popular landscape shrub due to the natural ability to stay at a manageable size, spring blooms, and attractive berries in the fall. If there was any drawback to the hawthorns, it would be that deer prefer them to any other plant when dining in everyone’s backyard. ‘Dwarf Pink’ forms a natural mound shape, no more than three feet tall.

Indian Hawthorn leaves are alternate and leathery to the touch, with serrated margins. ‘Dwarf Pink’ is a cultivar with dark green leaves that turn bronze-red in the fall.  Flowers in the spring are deep rose-pink, no more than ¾” in diameter and appearing in clusters. Pome fruits that follow in the fall are dark purple to black, attracting birds.  

Hawthorns prefer well drained soils, and can tolerate poor quality soil and even drought once established. 


Hawthorn, Pink Lady

Hawthorn, Pink Lady

Botanical Name: Raphiolepis indica 'Pink Lady'

Native to southern China, Indian Hawthorn is a popular landscape shrub due to the natural ability to stay at a manageable size, spring blooms, and attractive berries in the fall. If there was any drawback to the hawthorns, it would be that deer prefer them to any other plant when dining in everyone’s backyard. ‘Pink Lady’ forms a natural mound shape, no more than six feet tall.  

Indian Hawthorn leaves are alternate and leathery to the touch, with serrated margins. ‘Pink Lady’ is a cultivar with leaves that start bronze to burgundy, turning dark green within a month.  Flowers in the spring are pink, no more than ¾” in diameter and appearing in large clusters. Pome fruits that follow in the fall are dark purple to black, attracting birds.  

Hawthorns prefer well drained soils, and can tolerate poor quality soil and even drought once established. 


Hawthorn, Snow White

Hawthorn, Snow White

Botanical Name: Raphiolepis indica 'Snow White'

Native to southern China, Indian Hawthorn is a popular landscape shrub due to the natural ability to stay at a manageable size, spring blooms, and attractive berries in the fall. If there was any drawback to the hawthorns, it would be that deer prefer them to any other plant when dining in everyone’s backyard. ‘Snow White’ forms a natural mound shape, no more than three feet tall.  

Indian Hawthorn leaves are alternate and leathery to the touch, with serrated margins. ‘Snow White’ is a cultivar with leaves that start red to burgundy, turning dark green within a month.  Flowers in the spring are white, no more than ¾” in diameter and appearing in large clusters. Pome fruits that follow in the fall are dark purple to black, attracting birds.  

Hawthorns prefer well drained soils, and can tolerate poor quality soil and even drought once established. 


Holly, Burford Dwarf

Holly, Burford Dwarf

Botanical Name: Ilex cornuta 'Burfordii Nana'

For almost any landscape need, there is a cultivar or hybrid of The Chinese Holly (Ilex Cornuta) to satisfy it. Hollies prefer acidic fertile moist and well drained soils, but they adapt to the adverse condtions, including poorly drained soils. Young stems are yellow-green, turning silver-gray as they mature.

The Chinese hollies are dioecious, with small yellow-white flowers in the late spring and early summer, somewhat noticeable. Later in the fall they will develop highly ornamental red drupe berries in clusters that normally persist into the winter providing food for birds. These hollies have alternate simple leaves that are elliptical and feel like plastic; they will have at least one spine, and possibly up to several along leave margins.  

‘Burfordii nana’ is a dwarf cultivar of the Burfordii, averaging only six feet in height, not often up to eight feet.  Makes an excellent medium border or hedge. The berry fruits in the fall aren’t as abundant either.  The leaves have a sharp spine on the tip, and roughly half the leaves will have two spines along the sides.  


Holly, Dwarf Yaupon

Holly, Dwarf Yaupon

Botanical Name: Ilex vomitoria 'Nana'

Native to Texas, Yaupon Holly is a species of holly that tolerates the hot and dry Texas summers with relative ease, however prospers when provided more ideal conditions. Yaupons include evergreen shrubs or small trees with light gray bark, and small oval shaped alternate leaves with coarsely serrated margins. It forms multiple stems in clumps, giving the plant some density despite the smaller leaves. ‘Nana’ is a dwarf cultivar of Yaupon Holly, never growing over five feet in height or width. It’s often trimmed into hedges or shaped into topiary balls in the landscape.

The small white flowers in the spring are somewhat striking. The red drupe berries common with Yaupon are not as noticeable with ‘Nana’. They stay on during the winter, attracting birds and other wildlife as a food source.

Ilex vomitoria received its name from its usage with Native Americans; it was an ingredient in teas used in rituals that would induce vomiting.  Yaupon tolerates nearly any quality type of soil, and can be grown along the coastline as well. 


Holly, Possom Haw Yaupon

Holly, Possom Haw Yaupon

Botanical Name: Ilex decidua 'Warren's Red'

Breaking the mold of spiny, evergreen hollies is Ilex decidua, or Possomhaw – a deciduous Holly.

Possomhaw has a very upright growth habit when young, reaching up several feet before spreading out. Glossy dark green leaves cover this large shrub or small tree in the summer, turn yellow before falling off in the early winter.  Small white flowers are inconspicuous in the spring – and require a male Ilex decidua or opaca nearby to pollinate. If pollinated, they produce a large quantity of orange-red drupe berries common to the Hollies, that contract beautifully in the winter against the silver-grey bark.

‘Warren’s Red’ is an all-female cultivar that has the most quantitative berry load of the deciduous hollies. Best used in the landscape as a specimen or even providing summer shade against the house. Native to the wetlands of North America, Possomhaw adapts to poor soils conditions and is drought tolerant once established. 


Holly, Pride of Houston Yaupon

Holly, Pride of Houston Yaupon

Botanical Name: Ilex vomitoria 'Pride of Houston'

Native to Texas, Yaupon Holly is a species of holly that tolerates the hot and dry Texas summers with relative ease, however prospers when provided more ideal conditions. Yaupons include evergreen shrubs or small trees with light gray bark, and small oval shaped alternate leaves with coarsely serrated margins. It forms multiple stems in clumps, giving the plant some density despite the smaller leaves.

The small white flowers in the spring are somewhat striking; however the red drupe berries that follow in the fall to winter are the main attraction. They stay on during the winter, attracting birds and other wildlife as a food source. ‘Pride of Houston’ Yaupon is an all-female cultivar, guaranteeing berries every season.

Ilex vomitoria received its name from its usage with Native Americans; it was an ingredient in teas used in rituals that would induce vomiting.  Yaupon tolerates nearly any quality type of soil, and can be grown along the coastline as well.


Honeysuckle, Halls

Honeysuckle, Halls

Botanical Name: Lonicera japonica 'Halliana'
A vigorous semi-evergreen that is not only used as a vine or groundcover, but can be trimmed into a hedge. It should be segregated from other shrubs or small trees as it can rapidly cover them. Hall's Honesuckle grows up to 15 feet in length and bears fragrant yellow-white flowers throughout the warm seasons, attracting butterflies. It will grow in the shade, but will not flower. Tolerant of poor soils and drought, coupled with rapid growth habit make this honeysuckle an ideal choice for mass plantings on banks and slopes for controlling erosion. In the landscape, it tolerates heavy pruning (even mowing) in the fall to keep under control.

Honeysuckle, Purple

Honeysuckle, Purple

Botanical Name: Lonicera japonica 'Purpurea'
A vigorous semi-evergreen that is used as a vine or groundcover. It should be segregated from other shrubs or small trees as it can rapidly cover them. 'Purpureae' grows up to 15 feet in length and bears fragrant purplish-red and white flowers throughout the warm seasons, attracting butterflies. It will grow in the shade, but will not flower. The leaves are a dark green to purple-green on top, with a purple hue underneath. Tolerant of poor soils and drought, coupled with rapid growth habit make this honeysuckle an ideal choice for mass plantings on banks and slopes for controlling erosion. In the landscape, it tolerates heavy pruning (even mowing) in the fall to keep under control.

Impatiens

Impatiens

Botanical Name: Impatiens wallerana

One of the best annuals for the shade. Succulent green stems form a bushy mound without pruning. Wilts easily in the hot sun. Red, orange, pink, purle, or white flowers are 1-2" wide. Needs fertile, well-watered soil.

 

Spring-Summer 2011 Cultivars

S.E. Lipstick
S.E. XP Coral
S.E. XP Deep Pink
S.E. XP Red
S.E. XP Salmon
S.E. XP White
S.E. XP Violet


Iris, Bicolor

Iris, Bicolor

Botanical Name: Moraea bicolor

South Africa native clumping perennial with long, dark green strap leaves. Flower stems grow right above the leaves and produce yellow. Regular watering and fertilization encourage abundant flowers throughout the summer after the spring blooming period is past.

 

Dies back in cold winters to a rhizome; between this and the roots Bicolor Iris spreads easily by itself. Appreciates pruning in the winter when the leaves lose their color or outright die back.


Iris, Butterfly

Iris, Butterfly

Botanical Name: Moraea iridoides

South Africa native clumping perennial with long, dark green strap leaves that is also known as the African Iris.  Flower stems grow right above the leaves and produce white flowers that have a small purple and yellow center. Regular watering and fertilization encourage abundant flowers throughout the summer after the spring blooming period is past.

Dies back in cold winters to a rhizome; between this and the roots African Iris spreads easily by itself. Appreciates pruning in the winter when the leaves lose their color or outright die back.


Issai Beautyberry

Issai Beautyberry

Botanical Name: Callicarpa dichotoma 'Issai'

Compared to the American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana), Japanese Beautyberry has a more compact and uniform shape, making it a more manageable ornamental plant for any landscape. It is tolerant of poor soil quality as long as it’s provided good drainage, and withstands urban environments very well.

The arching branches give Japanese Beautyberry an attractive rounded compact habit; the emerald green foliage emerges mid spring and is narrow, reaching up to four inches in length. Light pink flowers in the spring are shortly followed by green berries that turn an attractive lavender-purple in the late summer. The berries are quite numerous, and pull the branches closer to the ground – take care not to play anything too close as it will be blocked from the sun.

No serious pest or disease issues; blooms only on new growth, so be sure to prune in the winter to ensure the best unformed berry display for the next season. 


Ixora

Ixora

Botanical Name: Ixora coccinea

Dense tropical round-forming shrub popular for container plantings.

Dark green oblong leaves sometimes hidden behind the large dense clusters of red-orange flowers that persist throughout the warm season; blooms best in full sun. Grows best in acidic soils with regular nitrogen fertilizer treatment.

Pink and yellow blooming cultivars exist.


Japanese Blueberry Shrub

Japanese Blueberry Shrub

Botanical Name: Elaeocarpus decipiens

Native to Japan, the Japanese Blueberry Tree is a fast grower that needs plenty of room in the landscape. It exhibits a dense growth habit, multiple branching with an upright form. It isn’t terribly cold hardy, but will survive south of Austin if mulch in the winters.

New leaves emerge bronze, turning bright green before maturing dark green. Although evergreen, the older leaves will turn red and fall in the winter. Butterflies are easily attracted to the slightly fragrant greenish-white flowers that appear early in the summer, five-petaled and urn-shaped in racemes. Blue-black olive fruits mature in the fall, and are somewhat messy if planted near walkways.

Blueberry tree prefers well-drained alkaline soils. It responds very well to pruning and is versatile when shaped into a topiary or tree form. 


Japanese Blueberry Tree - Tree Form

Japanese Blueberry Tree - Tree Form

Botanical Name: Elaeocarpus decipiens

Native to Japan, the Japanese Blueberry Tree is a fast grower that needs plenty of room in the landscape. It exhibits a dense growth habit, multiple branching with an upright form. It isn’t terribly cold hardy, but will survive south of Austin if mulch in the winters.

New leaves emerge bronze, turning bright green before maturing dark green. Although evergreen, the older leaves will turn red and fall in the winter. Butterflies are easily attracted to the slightly fragrant greenish-white flowers that appear early in the summer, five-petaled and urn-shaped in racemes. Blue-black olive fruits mature in the fall, and are somewhat messy if planted near walkways.

Blueberry tree prefers well-drained alkaline soils. It responds very well to pruning and is versatile when shaped into a topiary or tree form. 


Jasmine, Asian

Jasmine, Asian

Botanical Name: Trachelospermum asiaticum
Contrary to the name, this is not a true Jasmine. Native to Asia, it has become widespread in the landscape as it is the most common choice when it comes to ground covers. Fast and vigorous growing, this evergreen tolerates heat and adverse conditions with no real pest issues. It will prefer and perform better in rich well-drained soils, but is drought tolerant once established. Spreads easily as the stems sprout roots when coming into contact with the ground, and often gets thick enough to prevent most weeds from growing. Although many other sources claim there are yellow and highly fragrant blooms, it's rare to see in Texas.

Jasmine, Carolina

Jasmine, Carolina

Botanical Name: Gelsemium sempervirens
Native to the southeastern US, the Carolina Jasmine is a popular landscape choice despite all parts containing a toxin that can be fatal if consumed. The flower nectar is also toxic to honeybees, and causes brood death when gathered and taken to the hive. This Jasmine grows best in the average homeowners landscape as it will grow only up to 20 feet, and responds will to regular pruning. Outstanding yellow trumpet shaped flowers appear early in the spring and persist for several weeks. Leaf spot is a common issue in wet months, so it is best planted in well ventilated and sunny areas.

Jasmine, Confederate

Jasmine, Confederate

Botanical Name: Trachelospermum jasminoides
Popular evergreen vine, also known as Star Jasmine, for the five petaled white flowers that are extremely fragrant, appearing in the spring. Climbs easily if grown near a lattice or trellis, otherwise will become a clumping groundcover spreading up to 20 feet.

Jasmine, Primrose

Jasmine, Primrose

Botanical Name: Jasminum mesnyi

Often used on highway medians, Primrose Jasmine is a fast growing, drought tolerant, and all-around tough shrub that needs its space in the landscape.   It features an open sprawling habit, often growing wider than tall. When grown along fence lines and walls, it grows somewhat vine like, reaching greater heights.

The green stems are square instead of round like most plants, with dark green glossy leaves divided into three leaflets. Primrose is best pruned in the winter – not only for removal of old foliage, but blooms will only appear on new growth. In the early spring the shrub is covered in slightly-fragrant yellow semi-double blooms that persist for a few weeks, sporadically until fall thereafter.

The branches grow up to lengths of eight feet on average, and drape gracefully around the shrub to form a large thick mound. In moist and fertile areas, branch tips touching the ground will sprout roots, self propagating the shrub to even greater widths. Smaller landscapes will require Primose to be pruned regularly, whereas in large open areas it’s an excellent massing, border, or even erosion controller. 


Kale, Flowering

Kale, Flowering

Botanical Name: Brassica oleracea 'sp.'
Small compact annual that looks like cabbage. Has fringed leaves with ruffled edges. Great for small borders.

Fall 2008 Cultivars : 'Redbor' 'Nagoya/Emperor Red'

Lamb's Ear

Lamb's Ear

Botanical Name: Stachys byzantina 'Helene Von Stein'

A mat-forming perennial with grey-white pubescent leaves that reach up to five inches in length, forming a small round mound. Flower stalks reach up to 18 inches, with small purple-pink flowers that are half an inch wide.

Grown best in the spring before humidity can adversly affect the foliage; best if planted in full sun and highly ventilated places.


Lantana, Confetti

Lantana, Confetti

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.
Texas native plant reaching heights of twelve inches, with several cultivars and colors to choose from. Highly durable perennial for any Texas landscape.

Lantana, Gold

Lantana, Gold

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.
Unlike the bush varieties, these only reach heights of twelve inches, but can spread up to three feet in width. Available in gold, purple, or white.

Lantana, Purple

Lantana, Purple

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.
Unlike the bush varieties, these only reach heights of twelve inches, but can spread up to three feet in width. Available in gold, purple, or white.

Lantana, Radiation

Lantana, Radiation

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.
Texas native plant reaching heights of four feet, with several cultivars and colors to choose from. Highly durable perennial for any Texas landscape.

Lantana, White

Lantana, White

Botanical Name: Lantana sp.
Unlike the bush varieties, these only reach heights of twelve inches, but can spread up to three feet in width. Available in gold, purple, or white.

Lemon, Improved Meyer's

Lemon, Improved Meyer's

Botanical Name: Cirtrus x meyeri 'Improved Meyer'

The ‘Improved Meyer’s Lemon was released by the University of California in 1975 to replace the Meyer’s Lemon that fell susceptible to the tristeza virus in the 1940s. It is an ideal container citrus plant, as it is cold hardy but prefers warm areas so it can continue blooming throughout the year.

It often requires little trimming as it matures at a maintainable size naturally. It is a vigorous grower, able to begin setting fruit four years after germination. The shiny glossy wide green leaves sometimes hide the spines that adorn the branches. Highly fragrant light pink to white blooms appear throughout the warm season, and can even appear when inside houses for the winter – they easily attract birds, butterflies, and hummingbirds. The yellow lemons ripen within two months after setting, and appear most in the late spring to fall and are sweeter than they are sour.  


Ligustrum, Japanese

Ligustrum, Japanese

Botanical Name: Ligustrum lucidum

Native to Japan, this fast grower is recognized as a strong candidate for poor-soil and drought-prone landscapes. The dull-green leaves have a distinct pointed tip, and are arranged opposite on the stems that quickly shoot up from the base in several directions. Naturally forms an large open habit shrub,  but is easily pruned into a small tree. It is not uncommon to find it pruned into topiary shapes, although Waxleaf Ligustrum would be a more ideal choice.

Large clusters up to eight inches in length appear in the spring, bearing slightly fragrant white flowers. They are followed by green berries in the summer, turning dark blue to black for the winter.  Birds feast on the berries, and then distribute the seeds across the area. Due to the ease of germination, Japanese Ligustrum spreads quickly.

If planting in a row, remember Japanese Ligustrum can reach widths of 15 feet. Although drought tolerant, leaves will droop, but spring back after receiving water. No notable plant disease issues. 


Ligustrum, Varigated Privit

Ligustrum, Varigated Privit

Botanical Name: Ligustrum sinense 'Variegatum'

This quick growing cultivar of the Green Ligustrum has creamy white and green foliage, making an excellent choice for an accent plant or a distinctive hedge. Multiple stems form a somewhat thick clump, and are not adversely affected by regular pruning. The branches are thin and flexible, and will exhibit a slight weeping or fountain look when left unpruned at maturity. It is not uncommon for a few of the branches to revert back to being fully green, giving the impression two plants occupy the same space.

Variegated Privit requires ample sunlight to maintain thick leaf cover; avoid planting in too much shade or next to plants or buildings that will subject it to full shade.

Bright white flowers appear in the spring on new stems, and are somewhat visible against the foliage. Unnoticeable black fruits follow in the fall. No serious pest issues, but it can’t grow in wet or compacted soils.  


Ligustrum, Waxleaf

Ligustrum, Waxleaf

Botanical Name: Ligustrum japonicum 'Texanum'

Native to Japan, the Waxleaf Ligustrum is the most universally applied choice for a sculpted hedge plant in the Texas landscape; it is fast growing and not picky about when it is pruned. In addition to being pruned into hedges, it also can be pruned into a topiary, pyramidal form, or even a small tree.  

Highly fragrant  panicles of white flowers appear in the late spring, and carry into the early summer. Small dull blue-black fruits develop in the fall, attracting birds easily.

It differs from Japanese Ligustrum by having very glossy dark green leaves that easily snap when bent, and have no pointed tip. Once established, it’s very drought tolerant and grows well in urban or salty areas. 'Texanum' is a dwarf cultivar with a tighter growth habit, as well as reaching only heights up to nine feet. 

 


Lirope, Aztec Grass

Lirope, Aztec Grass

Botanical Name: Lirope gigantea 'Aztec'
Clump forming plant with blue blooms in the summer, followed by black berries in the fall. Maturing at 30 inches tall and 24 inches wide, Aztec Grass is ideal for small hedges or contrasting borders. Leaves are green with white margins.

Lirope, Big Blue

Lirope, Big Blue

Botanical Name: Lirope muscari 'Big Blue'
Clump forming plant with blue blooms in the summer, followed by black berries in the fall. Growing only 12 inches tall and wide, Big Blue forms a small dense mass, with leaves that lay down in the cold winters.

Lirope, Giant

Lirope, Giant

Botanical Name: Lirope gigantea
Clump forming plants that have blue blooms in the summer, with black berries in the fall. Ideal small hedge or border plant, reaching only 30 inches tall and 24 inches wide.

Loquat, Japanese Plum

Loquat, Japanese Plum

Botanical Name: Eriobotrya japonica

Native to China and Japan, the Japanese Plum loquat is an excellent medium sized tree that tolerates alkaline soils and drought, making it ideal for the Texas landscape. It makes an ideal specimen, accent, or privacy screen when several are grown in a row.

Large thick leaves are up to twelve inches in length, dark green on top and light green on the bottom; new leaves are rust-colored and slightly pubescent. Fragrant clusters of yellow-white flowers appear in the early winter, which attract bees and butterflies easily. If grown in areas devoid of freezing temperatures, fruits develop and ripen in the spring.  When ripe, they attract birds and wasp, so avoid planning right next to areas people sit or walk. 


Mahonia, Leather Leaf

Mahonia, Leather Leaf

Botanical Name: Mahonia japonica 'Bealei'

Native to China, leatherleaf mahonia is an evergreen clumping shrub with multiple upright branches and a loose growing habit. Leaves are pinnately compound, whorled around the stem with spined hollylike leaflets.

Fragrant yellow flowers appear in late winter on erect racemes, forming clusters of green berries in spring turning blueish-black in summer, providing food for wildlife.

Mahonia prefers to be grown in shaded areas, flowering best when giving partial shade.  It also appreciates regular watering in well-drained soils. Regular pruning of the taller stems helps regulate the irregular growth pattern and maintain a uniform shape. 


Marigold

Marigold

Botanical Name: Tagetes erecta 'Janie'
Annuals with strongly scented leaves and flowers. Big bushy plant with double flowers 2-4" wide, in yellow or orange. Like it hot and dry, will rot in wet conditions. Found in the salad section in grocery stores to add to salads.

Spring 2009 Cultivars : Janie Bright Yellow Janie Deep Orange

Mexican Buckeye

Mexican Buckeye

Botanical Name: Ungnadia speciosa

A Texas deciduous shrub that provides beautiful blooms and fall color.  It is commonly found along the river and creek beds of central Texas, and grows well in poor soils and limestone areas, provided there is adequate drainage.  

Mexican Buckeye is generally multi-trunked, but can be pruned regularly to maintain a single trunk like a small tree.  Clusters of bright pink flowers emerge before the leaves in the spring and are slightly fragrant. Before the blooms are spent, light bronze leaflets begin to emerge, turning light green. The pinnate leaves can be up to 12 inches long, with up to six pairs of leaflets, each up to five inches long. They turn a rich yellow color in the fall, falling at the first frost. New branches are smooth, however become fissured with age.

Distinctive tri-valved seed pods develop through the summer, splitting open before fall to reveal the black seeds.  It earned its name due to the seeds looking very similar to buckeyes, however, it is not related to Aesculus, and is the only species in the genus Ungadia


Mexican Heather

Mexican Heather

Botanical Name: Cuphea hyssopifolia 'Allyson'

Quick growing Mexican native perennial that reaches only twelve inches tall and wide returning in the spring if mulched heavily. Small attractive purple flowers appear in the early summer that stay till winter.

Attracts bees and butterflies easily.


Mexican Lime

Mexican Lime

Botanical Name: Citrus aurantifolia

Mexican Lime is also known as Key Lime, given to it for its pivotal role in flavoring Key Lime Pie. The limes are actually a bit more tart than your average lime.

No trunk has ever grown straight on the Mexican Lime, as they like to lean and change direction often. It is a shrubby tree with more thorns than your average citrus tree, although a thornless cultivar is available. Yellow-white flowers with purple streaks begin to appear in the spring and continue into fall; they are highly fragrant and readily attract bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies. The small citrus are no more than two inches in diameter and appear in abundance in the spring and fall, as well as sporadically throughout the summer.


Mexican Oregano

Mexican Oregano

Botanical Name: Poliomintha longiflora

Semi-evergreen perennial with purple tubular flowers from early summer to fall. Peforms well in hot and dry Texas summers, blooming more profusely with regular pruning and if grown in full sun.

Foliage can be used in cooking - a bit more kick than regular Oregano.

No serious pest and disease issues, best grown in well draining soils and full sun.


Monkey Grass

Monkey Grass

Botanical Name: Ophiopogon japonicus

Popular evergreen clumping grass with foliage that only reaches twelve inches tall. Monkey Grass spreads by the roots, becoming an ideal groundcover for shady areas. Dwarf cultivar, 'Nana' reaches only 3 inches and spreads slowly.


Monkey Grass, Dwarf

Monkey Grass, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Ophiopogon japonicus 'Nana'
Popular evergreen clumping grass with foliage that only reaches twelve inches in length. Monkey Grass spreads by the roots, becoming an ideal ground cover for shady areas. Dwarf cultivar, 'Nana' reaches only 3 inches and spreads slowly.

Moss Rose

Moss Rose

Botanical Name: Portulaca grandiflora
Great annual for hot and dry sits. Blooms early summer to frost, and only when it's a full sunny day. Trailing stems are covered with plump waxy round leaves, flowers are doubled and 1" wide, almost like small roses. Colors range from yellow, orange, red, pink, or white. Tolerates infertile soil and long dry spells. 2008 Fall Cultivars: Margarita Mix

Mountain Laurel

Mountain Laurel

Botanical Name: Sophora secundiflora

Extremely popular native found throughout the southern half of Texas.  Naturally grows as a multi-trunked shrub or small tree with fragrant spring blooms.

Texas Mountain Laurel is a slow growing evergreen that absolutely requires adequate drainage. Being native to rocky limestone areas, roots are not as robust and wide-growing as other trees, making container transplanting a cautious process.  The dark green compound leaves can have up to 9 leaflets, and cast a reasonable shade underneath that allows some under planting. Naturally grows as a multi-trunked shrub, however can be trimmed into a small tree form.  Very drought tolerant once established.

Large pendulous clusters of violet-lavender blooms appear early in the spring, reaching up to 10 inches in length. The smell is notably that of grape-koolaid, and sadly they only last for two to three weeks. Legume seed pods contain bright red to orange seeds with a very resilient seed coat – it could take years for germination to naturally occur! The cotyledon (white part inside the seed) inside is highly toxic, however not easily digested if the seed coat is fresh.

Mountain Laurel does fine without regular maintenance, however appreciates spring fertilization. 


Nandina, Compact

Nandina, Compact

Botanical Name: Nandina domestica 'Compacta'

The bright green stems and branching habit of the Nandina earned it the name Heavenly Bamboo, however it does not belong in the same plant family. Native to China and Japan, Nandina is a semi-evergreen plant species with several cultivars that allow it to fill several roles in the landscape. ‘Compacta’ is a cultivar that only reaches 4 feet in height, making it more manageable in smaller landscapes. The distinctive compound leaves have several leaflets that grow out on non-branching stems. Nearly all species of Nandina spread outward with underground rhizomes that will give the Nandina clumping form over time.

New foliage in the spring has a light red tint, turning green in the summer before turning red to red-bronze in the fall and winter. Large panicles of small white flowers appear on the ends of stems in the late spring, forming multitude of red-orange berries that provide handsome color in late summer and into winter. Birds seek the berries out for food in the winter, however they are mildly toxic to pets and livestock.

All Nandina species are highly tolerant of poor soil condition and quality, as long as it’s given adequate drainage and not sand; when given at least mediocre care, it’s also highly pest and disease resistant. It is an ideal plant for rarely maintained landscapes. 


Nandina, Domestic

Nandina, Domestic

Botanical Name: Nandina domestica

The bright green stems and branching habit of the Nandina earned it the name Heavenly Bamboo, however it does not belong in the same plant family. Native to China and Japan, Nandina is a semi-evergreen plant species with several cultivars that allow it to fill several roles in the landscape. The distinctive compound leaves have several leaflets that grow out on non-branching stems. Nearly all species of Nandina spread outward with underground rhizomes that will give the Nandina clumping form over time.

New foliage in the spring has a light red tint, turning green in the summer before turning red to red-bronze in the fall and winter. Large panicles of small white flowers appear on the ends of stems in the late spring, forming multitude of red-orange berries that provide handsome color in late summer and into winter. Birds seek the berries out for food in the winter, however they are mildly toxic to pets and livestock.

All Nandina species are highly tolerant of poor soil condition and quality, as long as it’s given adequate drainage and not sand; when given at least mediocre care, it’s also highly pest and disease resistant. It is an ideal plant for rarely maintained landscapes. 


Nandina, Gulfstream

Nandina, Gulfstream

Botanical Name: Nandina domestica 'Gulfstream'

The bright green stems and branching habit of the Nandina earned it the name Heavenly Bamboo, however it does not belong in the same plant family. Native to China and Japan, Nandina is a semi-evergreen plant species with several cultivars that allow it to fill several roles in the landscape. ‘Gulfstream’ is a cultivar from Hine’s Horticulture Inc. that is more compact and symmetrical in growth habit, making it the most manageable compact Nandina. The distinctive compound leaves have several leaflets that grow out on non-branching stems. ‘Gulfstream’ Nandina does not spread outward with underground rhizomes.  

New foliage in the spring has a flush of red color, turning blue-green in the summer before turning red-bronze in the fall and winter. ‘Gulfstream’ does not bloom heavily, and seldom sets berries.

All Nandina species are highly tolerant of poor soil condition and quality, as long as it’s given adequate drainage and not sand; when given at least mediocre care, it’s also highly pest and disease resistant. It is an ideal plant for rarely maintained landscapes. 


Nandina, Harbor Dwarf

Nandina, Harbor Dwarf

Botanical Name: Nandina domestica 'Harbor Dwarf'

The bright green stems and branching habit of the Nandina earned it the name Heavenly Bamboo, however it does not belong in the same plant family. Native to China and Japan, Nandina is a semi-evergreen plant species with several cultivars that allow it to fill several roles in the landscape. ‘Harbor Dwarf’ is a groundcover cultivar. The distinctive compound leaves have several leaflets that grow out on non-branching stems. ‘Harbor Dwarf’ Nandina excels at spreading outward with underground rhizomes.

New foliage in the spring has a flush of red color, turning bright green in the summer before turning red-bronze in the fall and winter. Large panicles of small white flowers appear on the ends of stems in the late spring, but doesn’t set berries like Nandina Domestica.

All Nandina species are highly tolerant of poor soil condition and quality, as long as it’s given adequate drainage and not sand; when given at least mediocre care, it’s also highly pest and disease resistant. It is an ideal plant for rarely maintained landscapes. 


Nandina, Nana

Nandina, Nana

Botanical Name: Nandina domestica 'Nana Atropurpurea'

The bright green stems and branching habit of the Nandina earned it the name Heavenly Bamboo, however it does not belong in the same plant family. Native to China and Japan, Nandina is a semi-evergreen plant species with several cultivars that allow it to fill several roles in the landscape. ‘Nana’ is a very compact cultivar with a spherical growth habit. The distinctive compound leaves have several leaflets that grow out on non-branching stems.

New foliage in the spring has a flush of bright green, turning bright yellow-green in the summer before turning crimson-red in the fall and winter. Rarely blooms and produces berries.  

All Nandina species are highly tolerant of poor soil condition and quality, as long as it’s given adequate drainage and not sand; when given at least mediocre care, it’s also highly pest and disease resistant. It is an ideal plant for rarely maintained landscapes. 


Oak, Bur

Oak, Bur

Botanical Name: Quercus macrocarpa

Bur Oak (also spelled Burr) is the most cold and drought tolerant of the oaks, able to thriveas far north as Alaska. A white oak, Bur Oak is a slow growing deciduous tree, averaging one foot per season. Naturally forms a wide open crown, growing wider than tall in the landscape, only starting to be taller than wide after reaching heights over 50 feet.

The deeply ridged bar is ash-gray to dark brown in color, with fissures getting deeper with age. Leaves can grow up to nine inches in length, narrow but with deep lobes at the base, becoming much wider at the end.

Bur Oak is monoecious, and blooms right after the leaves appear in the spring; yellow-green male catkins are up to four inches long, while female flowers are green and appear in short single spikes. The largest acorns of the oaks follow shortly thereafter – measuring up to two inches across. They are enclosed in a large cap with overlapping scales and sport an attractive fringe; it looks very much like the bur of a chestnut, giving this oak its name. Avoid planting Bur Oak in parking lots, as the acorns can damage vehicles. 


Oak, Lacey

Oak, Lacey

Botanical Name: Quercus laceyi

Native to central and south Texas, the Lacey Oak is known by many names – Quercus glaucoides, Blue Oak Canyon Oak, Encino Oak, Mountain Oak, Smokey Oak, or Rock Oak.  It was previously awarded the title of a Texas Superstar for its wide tolerance of soil types (as long as well drained) and conditions and ease of transition into any Texas landscape.

New foliage is slightly pubescent and peach colored, turning blue-green in the summer and brown to yellow in the fall. They are thicker to the touch than other oak leaves, and have shallow lobes.  The tree exhibits an upright branching habit, and when grown in the wild can produce multiple trunks; nursery stock is often pruned for single trunk. Forms an irregular round crown, with shallow furrows and scaled ridged bark.

Maturing at 35 feet, Lacey Oak is an ideal shade tree for the small backyard. 


Oak, Live

Oak, Live

Botanical Name: Quercus virginiana

Live Oak is not only a predominate icon of the Southern landscape, but a popular addition to many landscapes thanks to being fast growing, highly durable, and its longevity. It’s also resistant to salt spray, drought, and poor soil qualities. They are highly attractive found growing horizontally along the ground before reaching upward, however nearly all landscapers and homeowners choose a single, upright trunked specimen. Live Oak can also host other plants on its trunk and branches: ball moss, Spanish moss, mistletoe, and resurrection fern.

Although Live Oak is evergreen, it will heavily defoliate in the late winter when new foliage begins to emerge.  Leaves are stiff and leathery, shiny dark green on top and pale gray on the underside. Green catkin flowers up to four inches in length appear in the spring, dumping pollen that is easily spread by the wind. Acorns vary in size, averaging one inch in length and are tan-brown until turning black in the fall.

The dark brown to black bark is thick and slightly furrowed, forming large alligator-scale bark plates as it ages. The wood is some of the heaviest of the oak family, commonly used for carpentry, fuel, and grilling.

Sprouts from the roots can become a nuisance; dense saplings can surround the main trunk, requiring constant pruning if you wish to avoid a clump of trees. A fungus has also been identified as the culprit in oak wilt disease, killing many live oaks that have grown in the countryside throughout Texas.  


Oak, Mexican

Oak, Mexican

Botanical Name: Quercus polymorpha

Native to Texas and Monterrey, Mexico, the Mexican Live Oak is a fast growing oak tree with a pyramidal growth habit topping out at 80 feet. It is a white oak, making it is resistant to the oak wilt disease.

Creates a nice windbreak or shade with the thick leathery olive-green leaves; although evergreen, it will drop half the leaves in the late winter when new leaves begin to emerge. The bark is dark gray to brown and scaley.

The acorns are a good source of food for squirrels, birds and deer. Although it prefers rich deep soil, it adapts to more unfavorable conditions. 


Oak, Red

Oak, Red

Botanical Name: Quercus shumardii

Texas native Shumard Oak is commonly found along creeks and swamps where it prefers moist well-drained soils. Reaching heights over 100 feet and up to 60 feet in width, forming a broad pyramidal crown; it is one of the largest red oaks available, so plant with consideration.

New growth is light grey and very smooth. With age, the trunk and branches begin to darken, developing ridges and becoming only slightly furrowed. The broad leaves are lobbed with distinctive points, growing up to eight inches in length. They are dark green on top, light green on the bottom, and turn shades of yellow, red and brown in the fall. Under late summer heat stress or drought conditions, leaves will die and fall premature.

Acorns are up to one inch in diameter, but take up to three years to fully mature; they are common food source for birds, squirrels, and deer. 


Oak, Sierra

Oak, Sierra

Botanical Name: Quercus canbyi

Sierra Oak, a red oak, naturally grows in a pyramidal shape while it is young, developing a broader canopy after several years. With a mature size of 30 feet tall, it is an idea oak tree for the medium sized Texas landscape, and can grow in any area throughout Texas.  

Although it's classified as an evergreen, it will shed a majority of its leaves in the late winter much like Live or Mexican Oak. New foliage is red before turning a rich green color, turning red again in the fall. Laves are up to three inches long, and resemble a holly leaf. 


Oleander, Dwarf

Oleander, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Nerium oleander 'cv.'

Oleander is a popular evergreen blooming landscape shrub that presumably originated from Asia; in the genus Nerium, it is the only species with over 400 cultivars accounted for. A popular choice due to its rapid growth habit, marvelous blooms, and tolerance to drought and poor soils.

Oleander sends out large erect stems outward from its base in every direction. The leaves are arranged in whorls around the branches, bright to dark green, thick and leathery reaching up to six inches in length. The dwarf cultivars leaves are slightly smaller, and overall the plant matures at five feet.  Every spring, clusters of flowers up to one and a half inches in diameter emerge on the tips of new branches, persisting for several weeks, and then continue to emerge sporadically throughout the season. The fruits that follow are long narrow capsules that contain numerous seeds.

Oleander is one of the most poisonous landscape plants available – every part of the plant is toxic. Lately, it has had serious issues with bacterial blight, which is easily cultivated in areas without good air circulation or high moisture. The first stages result in black and brown spots on the leaves, followed by total defoliation of stems. Once canker growths are forming on the stems, it’s too late to try and save. The bacteria will remain in the soil, so any new oleanders that are planted there will surely get the disease again. 


Oleander, Pink

Oleander, Pink

Botanical Name: Nerium oleander

Oleander is a popular evergreen blooming landscape shrub that presumably originated from Asia; in the genus Nerium, it is the only species with over 400 cultivars accounted for. A popular choice due to its rapid growth habit, marvelous blooms, and tolerance to drought and poor soils.

Oleander sends out large erect stems outward from its base in every direction. The leaves are arranged in whorls around the branches, bright to dark green, thick and leathery reaching up to eight inches in length. Every spring, clusters of flowers up to two inches in diameter emerge on the tips of new branches, persisting for several weeks, and then continue to emerge sporadically throughout the season. The fruits that follow are long narrow capsules that contain numerous seeds.

Oleander is one of the most poisonous landscape plants available – every part of the plant is toxic. Lately, it has had serious issues with bacterial blight, which is easily cultivated in areas without good air circulation or high moisture. The first stages result in black and brown spots on the leaves, followed by total defoliation of stems. Once canker growths are forming on the stems, it’s too late to try and save. The bacteria will remain in the soil, so any new oleanders that are planted there will surely get the disease again. 


Oleander, Red

Oleander, Red

Botanical Name: Nerium oleander

Oleander is a popular evergreen blooming landscape shrub that presumably originated from Asia; in the genus Nerium, it is the only species with over 400 cultivars accounted for. A popular choice due to its rapid growth habit, marvelous blooms, and tolerance to drought and poor soils.

Oleander sends out large erect stems outward from its base in every direction. The leaves are arranged in whorls around the branches, bright to dark green, thick and leathery reaching up to eight inches in length. Every spring, clusters of flowers up to two inches in diameter emerge on the tips of new branches, persisting for several weeks, and then continue to emerge sporadically throughout the season. The fruits that follow are long narrow capsules that contain numerous seeds.

Oleander is one of the most poisonous landscape plants available – every part of the plant is toxic. Lately, it has had serious issues with bacterial blight, which is easily cultivated in areas without good air circulation or high moisture. The first stages result in black and brown spots on the leaves, followed by total defoliation of stems. Once canker growths are forming on the stems, it’s too late to try and save. The bacteria will remain in the soil, so any new oleanders that are planted there will surely get the disease again. 


Oleander, White

Oleander, White

Botanical Name: Nerium oleander

Oleander is a popular evergreen blooming landscape shrub that presumably originated from Asia; in the genus Nerium, it is the only species with over 400 cultivars accounted for. A popular choice due to its rapid growth habit, marvelous blooms, and tolerance to drought and poor soils.

Oleander sends out large erect stems outward from its base in every direction. The leaves are arranged in whorls around the branches, bright to dark green, thick and leathery reaching up to eight inches in length. Every spring, clusters of flowers up to two inches in diameter emerge on the tips of new branches, persisting for several weeks, and then continue to emerge sporadically throughout the season. The fruits that follow are long narrow capsules that contain numerous seeds.

Oleander is one of the most poisonous landscape plants available – every part of the plant is toxic. Lately, it has had serious issues with bacterial blight, which is easily cultivated in areas without good air circulation or high moisture. The first stages result in black and brown spots on the leaves, followed by total defoliation of stems. Once canker growths are forming on the stems, it’s too late to try and save. The bacteria will remain in the soil, so any new oleanders that are planted there will surely get the disease again. 


Olive, European

Olive, European

Botanical Name: Olea europaea 'Mission'

Native to the Mediterranean, Olive trees have quickly found their place in the Texas landscape. They are utilized for their hardiness with the weather, tolerance to poor soils, and manageable size. Some of the olive trees overseas are known to be over 1,000 years old.

The Olive tree often has multiple trunks, however often trained to have a single trunk; if it severely damaged or cut down, new trunks will emerge from the roots. The grey-green leaves are thick and leathery, with stomata on the undersides that aid in water conservation. Flower buds are borne on the axils of leaves, often budding up a year before they open. The inflorescences average 15 to 30 flowers, but are often inconspicuous, but with a slight fragrance.

The drupe olive fruits start green, and turn black when they ripen in the fall. It is commonly believed they are toxic, however they are simply extremely bitter and often get cured before being eaten. 


Olive, Mexican

Olive, Mexican

Botanical Name: Cordia boissieri

The Mexican Olive is native to southern areas of Texas, but will not grow north of Austin due to its low tolerance to freezing temperatures. A large shrub that is easily pruned into small tree form, it averages twenty feet high, making it ideal for small landscape areas. It is also drought tolerance once established, and tolerates any quality of soil as long as it’s adequately drained.

Soft, dark-green leaves are a wonderfull backdrop to the clusters of showy white trumpet-shaped flowers that appear throughout the spring and summer. The fleshy fruits that follow feed the birds, deer, and cattle that find them, but they are slightly toxic and not for us to eat.

Pest and disease free, Texas Olive’s only real issue is tenderness to freeze damage; it can recover from a light freeze, but only waiting till the growth comes back in the summer will you be able to tell if it didn’t make it.  


Palm, Mediterrarean Fan

Palm, Mediterrarean Fan

Botanical Name: Chamaerops humilis

The Mediterranean Fan palm, or European Fan Palm, is a cold-hardy palm that keeps a maintainable size at 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide. The main trunk is often covered in brown bristly-hairs, with the base of old leaves persisting. The blue-green leaves predominantly have an upright habit, and can reach up to two feet across --the stems are lined with extremely stiff spines.

Although small and of manageable size, the Mediterranean Fan Palm often sprouts multiple trunks from the base, resulting in a clump-forming palm as it matures. Although some home owners desire to have a single trunk, it’s not easy as the small trunks are secure at the base, and the leaves are covered in those vicious spines.

Bright yellow flowers appear at the top of the trunk, but are often hidden behind the leaves and often go unnoticed. The reddish-brown fruits that follow are often unseen as well. Grows very well with regular watering, however will tolerate drought conditions and poor soils as long as it’s given adequate drainage. 


Palm, Pindo

Palm, Pindo

Botanical Name: Butia capitata

This feather leaf palm is best planted in large areas where the leaves don’t need to be trimmed to make room for walkways or traffic. The overall height of the Pindo is only 20 feet, however the leaves can reach up to 10 feet past the four foot stems, falling downward then curving back towards the trunk. They are pinnate, and blue-gray to silver-gray in color, with spines down the leaf stems.

In the late spring to early summer female palms have a thick pink-purple inflorescence emerging from the crown. Fall brings bright orange pindo dates that are popular for making jellies and jams. If left on the plant, they can create a large mess that attracts insects and vermin.

Pindo Palm doesn’t tolerate extended periods of freezing temperatures, and grows best in well-drained sandy soils. Once established, it’s incredibly drought tolerant. 


Palm, Sago

Palm, Sago

Botanical Name: Cycas revoluta

This landscape palm is a lovely conversation piece for any landscape, as it can fire up debates depending on your beliefs -- scientist estimate this plant was growing on this planet over 150 million years ago! Sago Palm is almost a misnomer, as it belongs to the plant family Cycadaceae, and is a palm only by aesthetics alone.

It forms a prominent trunk that grows very slow with age. Once or possibly twice a year, new bright green leaves emerge from the central trunk, then slowly unfurling like a fern to reveal leaves up to five feet long. Although soft to the touch and fragile, the leaves eventually harden up with a stiff midrib, sporting plenty of needle like leaves with a sharp point, turning dark green.  Leaves are noticeably larger when grown in full shade.

Sago Palm is dioecious, with easily identified blooms for the male and female. It also reproduces from small suckers borne at the base of the plant; the ideal time to remove them would be in winter with a shovel or hatchet.

Sago palm appreciates well drained soils, and a slow release fertilizer on a regular basis . Be sure to cover in freezing temperatures as leaves will die if exposed too long, and it would take quite a while to replenish all the leaves. 


Palm, Washintonia

Palm, Washintonia

Botanical Name: Washingtonia robusta

An attractive upright growing palm that sways easily in the wind as the gray-ringed trunk is at maximum twelve inches thick; this palm sways easily in the wind. Greatly appreciates rich, fertile soils but can tolerate worse and even withstand periods of drought.

The large palmate leaves have a slight drooping effect on the ends, and grow up to five feet in length and width. The leaf steams are light green with orange streaks, and have prominent spines along both edges. Once the older leaves die, they lay down flat and begin to form a highly attractive skirt or curtain around the trunk. Several years’ worth of leaves will continue to fall and pile on each other, which although attractive, can become the home of rats and other vermin -- great care must be taken when pruning old dead leaves.

Creamy white inflorescences appear in the early summer on stalks up to ten feet in length, growing out beyond the leaves. They produce black berries that easily attract wildlife, or germinate quickly after falling to the ground.  


Palm, Windmill

Palm, Windmill

Botanical Name: Trachycarpus fortunei

Windmill Palm is the most cold-hardy upright palm available for the state of Texas. Relatively fast growing if grown in fertile soil with regular watering, but can grow in drought conditions with little soil nutrients.

Windmill is idea in tight landscape areas as it’s completely upright growing, with the main trunk no more than twelve inches in diameter. The large palm leaves are at the end of stems up to three feet in length, forming a nearly completely symmetrical crown. To assist in identification, there are no thorns on the palm branches. The upper trunk is covered in a loose mat of brown fiber, while lower trunk is uncovered, displaying a handsome smooth ringed trunk.

 Windmill is dioecious, meaning only the female will bear large long branched inflorescence blooms in the spring, with clusters of blue fruits in the fall. 


Pansy

Pansy

Botanical Name: Viola x

Popular bedding plants that bloom all winter long. Mainly come in a blue-yellow-white flower, but also available in yellows, creams, and blues. Self-seeds easily.

2009 Expected Cultivars:

Colossus Deep Blue W/ Blotch
Colossus Neon Violet
Colossus Red W/ Blotch
Colossus Rose W/ Blotch
Colossus White W/ Blotch
Colossus Yellow W/ Blotch
Delta Blaze Mix
Delta Blue W/ Blotch
Delta Primose W/ Blotch
Delta Premium Deep Blue W/ Blotch
Delta Premium Pure Golden Yellow
Delta Premium Pure Yellow
Delta Premium Pure Violet
Delta Premium White W/ Blotch
Delta Premium True Blue
Delta Premium Pure Red
Delta Premium Pure White
Delta Premium Pure Violet
Delta Premium Yellow W/ Blotch
Designer Rising Sun
Dynamite Wine Flash
MG II BOnfire
MG II Marina Shades
MG II Ocean
MG II Purple W/ Bloth
MG II Red W/ Blotch
MG II White W/ Blotch
MG II Yellow W/ Blotch
Matrix Purple
Matrix Sunrise
Matrix White W/ Blotch
Matrix Yellow W/ Blotch


Pear, Bradford

Pear, Bradford

Botanical Name: Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford'

The Bradford Pear is a popular ornamental tree known for its spring blooms and fall color. ‘Bradford’ differs from the others in that it’s fast growing, forming a natural round to teardrop shape.  It’s popular in cities as it tolerates many soil types, air pollution, and drought.

White flowers cover the tree in the late winter; they are no more than one inch in diameter and borne in clusters, averaging a dozen each -- flower show is best after a cold winter. Leaves begin to emerge as the flowers drop; simple ovate leaves roughly 3 inches long, which turn vibrant shades of red, purple, and orange in the fall. The leaves will hold onto the tree longer nearly till frost – that’s longer than other deciduous tree.

Bradford Pear does not produce any edible or ornamental pears -- they are roughly half an inch in diameter and difficult to notice. Although popular and easy to find in many nurseries, Bradford normally won’t live past 25 years due to the compact branching leading to broken limbs past starting at 15 years of age. 


Pentas, Pink

Pentas, Pink

Botanical Name: Pentas lanceolata 'Graffiti Rose'
Pentas, originally from Africa, have been a popular summer bloomer in Texas for many years. They do require regular watering, and are not the best choice for xeriscaping. Ideal for flowerbeds with good drainage and container planting. The shiny and deeply veined foliage is a beautiful backdrop for the constant display of star shaped tubular flowers appearing in clusters from late spring to fall. Available in many colors, Graffiti Rose is a cultivar with Pink flowers. No matter the color, pentas easily attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Pentas are often treated as an annual in central to north Texas, however can be perennial in southern Texas.

Pentas, Red

Pentas, Red

Botanical Name: Pentas lanceolata 'Graffiti Bright Red'
Pentas, originally from Africa, have been a popular summer bloomer in Texas for many years. They do require regular watering, and are not the best choice for xeriscaping. Ideal for flowerbeds with good drainage and container planting. The shiny and deeply veined foliage is a beautiful backdrop for the constant display of star shaped tubular flowers appearing in clusters from late spring to fall. Available in many colors, Graffiti Bright Red is a cultivar with red flowers. No matter the color, pentas easily attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Pentas are often treated as an annual in central to north Texas, however can be perennial in southern Texas.

Pentas, Violet

Pentas, Violet

Botanical Name: Pentas lanceolata 'Graffiti Violet'
Pentas, originally from Africa, have been a popular summer bloomer in Texas for many years. They do require regular watering, and are not the best choice for xeriscaping. Ideal for flowerbeds with good drainage and container planting. The shiny and deeply veined foliage is a beautiful backdrop for the constant display of star shaped tubular flowers appearing in clusters from late spring to fall. Available in many colors, Graffiti Violet is a cultivar with violet flowers. No matter the color, pentas easily attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Pentas are often treated as an annual in central to north Texas, however can be perennial in southern Texas.

Pentas, White

Pentas, White

Botanical Name: Pentas lanceolata 'Graffiti White'
Pentas, originally from Africa, have been a popular summer bloomer in Texas for many years. They do require regular watering, and are not the best choice for xeriscaping. Ideal for flowerbeds with good drainage and container planting. The shiny and deeply veined foliage is a beautiful backdrop for the constant display of star shaped tubular flowers appearing in clusters from late spring to fall. Available in many colors, Graffiti White is a cultivar with white flowers. No matter the color, pentas easily attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Pentas are often treated as an annual in central to north Texas, however can be perennial in southern Texas.

Persimmon, Texas

Persimmon, Texas

Botanical Name: Diospyros texana

Outstanding Texas native found in the rocky limestone areas from west to east texas; Texas Persimmon is a small tree with an irregular growth habit, known for its tolerance to pretty much most of Texas in terms of environment, weather, and pest.

The trunk has smooth, light gray bark; as it matures, it peels off in slightly brittle patches displaying fresh bark with shades of white, grey, and pink. Leaves are only up to two inches in length, light to dark green and slightly rolled downward on the sides.

Flowers are borne only on female Persimmon trees, never more than a half-inch wide and bell shaped. They appear in clusters on new growth in March to April, then form small one inch wide green fruits that turn black and ripen in September. Although they are edible, they do well in attracting wildlife; they also stain clothes and desk easily so avoid planting in foot paths.  


Petunia

Petunia

Botanical Name: Petunia hybrida

We carry Wave Petunias and Carpet Petunias, Wave being our favorite; they can get 12-15" wide with a prostrate habit, while Carpet Petunias only get 10-12" wide and tall. Colors range in purple, lavender, white, pink, and red. It's also possible they die back in a light winter, only to return in the spring.

 

Spring 2011 Cultivars
Carpet Blue
Carpet Bright Red
Carpet Pink
Carpet Plum
Carpet Rose
Carpet Velvet
Carpet White

 


Philodendron, Split Leaf

Philodendron, Split Leaf

Botanical Name: Philodendron selloum

This tropical Brazilian native is semi-hardy for southern Texas; with large glossy leaves growing off a large unbranching stem that sprawls along the ground. The leaves are up to three feet in length, dissected into many large lobes with slight ruffles. It will reach heights of ten feet in warm climates, or dies back in colder only to return if protected sufficiently.

The bloom isn’t really noticeable; it emerges from the base only one foot in height, a modified leaf with a hood, with a club-shaped base in the middle being the flower.

Philodendron appreciates moist, well drained soils and does not tolerate drought conditions at all. It should be placed in the landscape with consideration of the directly the stem can grow. 


Photinia

Photinia

Botanical Name: Photinia x fraseri

Red Tip Photinia is a popular, fast growing, evergreen shrub commonly used as a screen or large hedge, reaching 15 feet tall and wide.  Fraseri has some tolerance to leaf spot and mildew, and is best grown in well ventilated sunny areas.

Large white blooms in the spring are only one of the visual aesthetics; rich bronze-red new foliage emerges from the branch tips, giving the Photinia the nickname "Redtip Photinia". They eventually turn a handsome green a month later, but new foliage will continue to slowly emerge through the summer. Easily pruned into hedges, topiaries, or even tree forms.

Photinia is drought tolerant once established, but it is in no way deer tolerate – it ranks pretty high on the deer’s favorite menu item right after Hawthorns. 


Pistache, Chinese

Pistache, Chinese

Botanical Name: Pistacia chinensis

A tough and durable tree that has found itself thriving in the Texas environment. Although it appreciates regular watering, it tolerates poor and dry soils and can be found growing wild in various parts of East Texas.

Chinese Pistache doesn’t grow uniformed when young, so minimal pruning is appreciated to help it along to when it’s several years old and develops a large, round oval top. At roughly ten years of age, female plants will set large clusters of red to pale green blooms early in the spring before foliage emerges. After the leaves emerge, small blue fruits begin to turn red, attracting birds easily as they mature in the fall.

The real value of the Pistache comes in the fall, when the foliage turns excellent shades of red, yellow, and orange, persisting for weeks until falling. It’s not uncommon for the female plants to continue having seeds on the tree after leaves have already fallen, providing yet more winter color. 


Pittosporum, Dwarf

Pittosporum, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Pittosporum tobira 'Wheelers Dwarf'

A popular broadleaf evergreen shrub native to China and Japan, the “Wheelers Dwarf” Pittosporum is a broadleaf evergreen shrub that is ideal for small areas as it only gets three feet tall and wide. It looks dense thanks to the leaves being whorled around the branches with a slight recurve. They are leathery to the touch, and glossy on the top while dull on underside. “Wheelers Dwarf” is considerably much slower growing, and has less tolerance to freezing temperatures.

Small fragrant white flowers are only half an inch in diameter and appear early in the spring, then slowly turn yellow as they progress into the summer.  They are followed by smaller  fruits in the late summer, not really noticeable.  

Pittosporum appreciates well drained soil, and regular watering and fertilization promotes thick, even growth. In a drought, it suffers more than regular pittosporum and will look rough till more optimal conditions return.   


Pittosporum, Green

Pittosporum, Green

Botanical Name: Pittosporum tobira

A popular broadleaf evergreen shrub native to China and Japan, Pittosporum is a broadleaf evergreen shrub that gets very tall and open in full sun, or remains compact and full in the shade. Normally growing as tall as it gets wide, Pittosporum forms an upright round head, looking dense thanks to the leaves being whorled around the branches with a slight recurve. They are leathery to the touch, and glossy on the top while dull on underside.

Small fragrant white flowers are only half an inch in diameter and appear early in the spring, then slowly turn yellow as they progress into the summer.  They are followed by stiff small fruits in the late summer, not overly noticeable against the foliage.

Pittosporum appreciates well drained soil, and regular watering and fertilization promotes thick, even growth. In a drought, the plant grows more loose and open, almost ragged, but recovers quickly when the water returns. 


Pittosporum, Variegated

Pittosporum, Variegated

Botanical Name: Pittosporum tobira 'Variegata'

A popular broadleaf evergreen shrub native to China and Japan, Pittosporum is a broadleaf evergreen shrub that gets very tall and open in full sun, or remains compact and full in the shade. Normally growing as tall as it gets wide, Pittosporum forms an upright round head, looking dense thanks to the leaves being whorled around the branches with a slight recurve. They are leathery to the touch, and glossy on the top while dull on underside. ‘Variegata’ is a variegated cultivar with grey-green leaves with cream colored margins. It’s not uncommon for some variegated Pittosporums to revert back to their green leaves; simply trim off those branches.

Small fragrant white flowers are only half an inch in diameter and appear early in the spring, then slowly turn yellow as they progress into the summer.  They are followed by stiff small fruits in the late summer, not overly noticeable against the foliage.

Pittosporum appreciates well drained soil, and regular watering and fertilization promotes thick, even growth. In a drought, the plant grows more loose and open, almost ragged, but recovers quickly when the water returns. 


Plum, Mexican

Plum, Mexican

Botanical Name: Prunus mexicana

Texas native tree ideal as a full sun specimen in the landscape, or as an understory for shaded areas. It tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, and is highly drought tolerant once established. Grows primarily as a single truck tree, allowing landscaping underneath with perennials or annual color.

Copious amounts of small white blooms cover the tree in the early spring, persisting for a couple weeks before foliage begins to emerge. The leaves are light green, up to five inches long and are folded over in such a way you think the tree is always in need of water. Plums start developing after the flowers drop, turning yellow-green to purple as they ripen into the fall. Although they are edible, the plums are often used to make jellies or jams. In colder climates, the leaves will turn shades of orange, yellow, and red before falling.

Young trees have a smooth, gray bark. As it grows, it turns darker in color, begins to peel off in patches, turning deep and furrowed in older age. Mexican plum is extremelly low maintenace, demanding very little attention for giving back such a gorgeous spring display. 


Plumbago

Plumbago

Botanical Name: Plumbago auriculata
Perennial best known for its large clusters of blue flowers spring to fall. Easily spreads up to five feet wide while reaching three feet tall.

Plumbago, Dwarf

Plumbago, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
This dwarf species looks almost nothing like regular Plumbago. The dark green leaves contrast the deep blue flowers that do not form large balls of flowers, but are loosly borne with only a few others at the ends of branches. Low growing perennial reaching only 15 inches high and wide, however spreads by underground rhizomes to become an attractive groundcover. Only slighly invasive with no serious pest or disease problems. Will die easily in poorly drained soils or from over-watering, and grows best with full sun in the morning and part shade in the heat of the afternoon.

Pomegranate, Double

Pomegranate, Double

Botanical Name: Punica granatum

Native to Asia, the Pomegranate is an attractive shrub to small tree that thrives in the heat of the Texas summers, and prized for the gorgeous blooms. Pomegranate is tolerant of many soil types, and does well in acidic or alkaline soils, in addition it shows some tolerance to salt spray, for those landscapes long the coast line.

Long slender branches can reach up to 15 feet tall, but easily weep or bend beyond that. Green leaves are arranged in whorls around the branches, and are no more than three inches in length, with minimal color change in the fall.

Flowers for this double blooming cultivar are orange-red with very ruffled petals reaching up to two and a half inches in width.  They begin in the late spring, and continue into late fall. The tradeoff for these gorgeous blooms is that the absence of fruits. 


Pomegranate, Dwarf

Pomegranate, Dwarf

Botanical Name: Punica granatum 'Nana'

Native to Asia, the Pomegranate is an attractive shrub to small tree that thrives in the heat of the Texas summers, and prized for the gorgeous blooms and fruits. Pomegranate is tolerant of many soil types, and does well in acidic or alkaline soils. It also shows some tolerance to salt spray, for those landscapes along the coast line.

 ‘Nana’ is a dwarf cultivar with shorter branches reaching only three feet tall. The bright green leaves are arranged in whorls around the branches, and are no more than an inch in length, with some color change in the fall.

The single borne flowers are orange-red with ruffled petals, no more than an inch and a half wide – they only appear on new growth so prune this shrub in late winter. They begin to appear in spring, and turn into smaller fruits in the fall that are no more than two inches in diameter. They make a handsome display against the foliage well into the winter after leaves drop in colder winters. 


Pomegranate, Wonderful

Pomegranate, Wonderful

Botanical Name: Punica granatum 'Wonderful'

Native to Asia, the Pomegranate is an attractive shrub or small tree that thrives in the heat of the Texas summers, and prized for the gorgeous blooms and fruits. Pomegranate is tolerant of many soil types, and does well in acidic or alkaline soils, in addition it shows some tolerance to salt spray, for those landscapes long the coast line.

Long slender branches can reach up to 15 feet tall, but easily weep or bend beyond that. Green leaves are arranged in whorls around the branches, and are no more than three inches in length, with minimal color change in the fall.

Flowers are normally orange-red and trumpet shaped, with very ruffled petals that are often no more than two inches long and wide. They begin in the late spring, and continue into summer before setting very attractive red-orange fruits; they have a rough membranous skin, with edible juice, pulp, and seeds.

‘Wonderful’ is the cultivar that is found throughout many grocery stores. Fruits should be picked before they look completely ripe, then placed in the refrigerator to finish ripen; they will turn out sweeter. Cutting down on water in the late summer will prevent fruit from cracking open before ripening.


Potato Vine

Potato Vine

Botanical Name: Ipomoea tricolor

Fast growing perennial vine with bright green heart-shaped leaves with tri-color variegated leaves. Trumpet shaped flowers can be up to five inches in diameter, opening in the morning and lasting only for one day. They are commonly grown as an annual vine, and can easily take over the area - a great choice for areas that can be unsightly year around but not easy to remove, such as fences, dead trees, or brush piles. 


Pride of Barbados

Pride of Barbados

Botanical Name: Caesalpinia pulcherrima

Known also as the Peacock Tree or Mexican Bird of Paradise, Pride of Barbados is native to the West Indies. An annual in north Texas, perennial in central to south, it reaches average heights of six feel tall in a growing season. It has a very open, spreading habit, multiple branches with small thorns so avoid planting directly on walking paths.

The bright green bipinnately compound leaves are very light, almost fern-link with leaflets no longer than three-quarters of an inch. It turns reddish yellow in the fall before dropping. Starting in the spring, large panicles of bright red, orange, and yellow blooms with long red stamens appear on the terminal ends of the branches. They continue to appear till fall, and are followed by seed pods no more than three inches long that dry over winter and split open, releasing the seeds.

Pride of Barbados requires easily drained soils, and can grow in acidic or alkaline areas. Mulch heavily to ensure protection from death in colder areas. Prune dead branches, or bring down to a manageable size in the late winter. 


Purslane

Purslane

Botanical Name: Portulaca oleracea
Great annual for hot and dry sits. Blooms early summer to frost, and only when it's a full sunny day. Trailing stems are covered with plump waxy round leaves, flowers are single and 1" wide,. Colors range from yellow, orange, red, pink, or white. Tolerates infertile soil and long dry spells.

Redbud, Forest Pansy

Redbud, Forest Pansy

Botanical Name: Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy'

A unique redbud native that is larger than C. reniformis, but smaller than Eastern Redbud.  Although it naturally is a multi-trunk small tree, they are often pruned to be single trunk. It thrives in fertile soil with regular watering. 

Clusters of rosey-pink flowers appear in the late winter to early spring before foliage, and continue for a couple weeks as the leaves begin to emerge. The leaves are a gorgeous scarlet-purple in color, that matures to a maroon shade. Although it is heat and drought tolerant, the leaves will turn an ugly shade of green when exposed to temperatures over 90F over long periods of time.  


Redbud, Oklahoma

Redbud, Oklahoma

Botanical Name: Cercis reniformis 'Oklahoma'

A Redbud found in Oklahoma (of all places) native that is a smaller, more manageable sized Redbud for the average landscape -- staying under 20 feet in height and width. Although it naturally is a multi-trunk small tree, they are often pruned to be single trunk. It thrives in fertile soil with regular watering, but it’s drought and heat tolerant, more so than the Eastern Redbud.  It’s one of the most cold-hardy of the redbuds available.

Clusters of red-purple flowers appear in the late winter to early spring before foliage, and continue for a couple weeks as the leaves begin to emerge. The seed pods are flat, brown and can be up to four inches long, persisting into the winter after leaves drop. The waxy, glossy green leaves are heart shaped. 


Redbud, Texas

Redbud, Texas

Botanical Name: Cercis reniformis 'Texas'

A Texas native that is a smaller, more manageable sized Redbud for the average landscape -- staying under 20 feet in height and width. Although it naturally is a multi-trunk small tree, they are often pruned to be single trunk. It thrives in fertile soil with regular watering, but it’s drought and heat tolerant, more so than the Eastern Redbud. It is not as cold hardy as Oklahoma redbud, but faster growing.

Clusters of rose-purple flowers appear in the late winter to early spring before foliage, and continue for a couple weeks as the leaves begin to emerge. The seed pods are flat, reddish brown and can be up to four inches long, persisting into the winter after leaves drop. The waxy, glossy green leaves are heart shaped, with slightly waved edges. 


Retama Tree

Retama Tree

Botanical Name: Parkinsonia aculeata

A fast growing Texas native tree with beautiful long arching, somewhat drooping, branches with thorns at the nodes. Cast a very light shade due to the very small leaves along the stems. Complimented nicely with multitude of bright yellow flowers borne in the spring and continue into the fall. Seed pods up to six inches in length follow, and persist on the tree until next spring when they begin to fall to the ground.

Retama tree is highly drought tolerant once established, and has no serious pest or disease issues. 


Rock Rose

Rock Rose

Botanical Name: Pavonia lasiopetala

Rock Rose is an extremely drought tolerant Texas native found thriving in the hot and dry areas across the state. This shrub like perennial has a very loose, lanky growth habit that resist forming any uniformed shape as it matures, encouraging regular pruning but can manage fine without.

Small five-petal flowers are no more than one inch across, appearing in the early summer and lasting till fall. The woody base and roots can be protected by winter freezing and death with a healthy layer of mulch. No real pest or disease problems.

Member of the Plants for Texas program


Rose, Apricot Drift

Rose, Apricot Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meimirrote'

 


Rose, Belinda's Dream

Rose, Belinda's Dream

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Belinda's Dream'

Originally introduced in 1988, Belinda’s Dream is a cross between ‘Tiffany’ and ‘Jersey Beauty’. It is the first rose to receive both a Texas Superstar and Earthkind designation. It’s quite resistant to black spot, mildew, and rust when planted in full sun and highly ventilated areas.

The dark blue-green foliage is a handsome backdrop for the large heavy double blooms that emerge on new branches, and have a slight fragrance. They are often borne on long branches, making them ideal for cut arrangements.

The shrub maintains an upright growth habit, and is quite sturdy up to five feet in height. Prune heavily in the late winter before spring to encourage heavy bloom set.  


Rose, Coral Drift

Rose, Coral Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meidrifora'

 Coral Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/599/index.htm


Rose, Icy Drift

Rose, Icy Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meipicdevoj'

Icy Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/1485/index.htm


Rose, Knock Out

Rose, Knock Out

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Radrazz'

Originally developed by William Radler, Conard Pyle holds the patent on one of the most popular line of roses that have reinvigorated roses for the Texas landscapes – the Knock Out Roses. The original of several cultivars, ‘Radrazz’ Knock Out Rose is highly resistant to diseases that plague other roses, while being very tolerant of hot and dry climates familiar to Texas. Since introduction, it has become the fastest selling new rose of all time.

The single blooms are a deep red cherry color, and appear abundantly in the late winter for a week or two, then drop off only to continue blooming again throughout the summer until first real frost. To maximize the amount of blooms, trimming the shrub midwinter will encourage more branches to fill out the plant, thus more blooms.  The foliage is a dark purple hue as it emerges, turning dark green for the summer. In the fall it turns a dark burgundy.

Won the All-America Rose award in 2000 when introduced, and Texas Superstar in 2004; Knockout has become a commonplace addition to any landscape since.  


Rose, Mutabilis

Rose, Mutabilis

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Mutabilis'

The Chinese Rose has many hybrids available, many that can be traced to their origins; Mutabilis’ origins are unknown, first appearing in 1896 in Italy. It was labeled “Earthkind Rose of the Year” by the Texas Cooperative Extension in 2005.

Its popularity is owed to the single (5 petal) blooms that open copper-yellow, then changing to pink, then finally crimson before dropping off all within a 36-hour timeframe. It’s common to see this rose bushy covered in blooms with all three colors at once any time from spring to fall. The petals are delicate, often curved and flowing in the slightest of wind, giving the impression of butterflies covering the bush.

Mutabilis is a vigorous grower, with a very lose and open growth habit, but will stay relatively the same height and width on its own. Pruning will help maintain its shape, but don’t expect it to make a thick, tight hedge without regular maintenance.

Like any rose, Mutabilis requires soil with good drainage – otherwise can tolerate soil that is acidic or alkaline. Once established it can be very drought and heat tolerant with very few pest problems. 


Rose, Nacogdoches

Rose, Nacogdoches

Botanical Name: Rosa chinensis 'Nacogdoches'

Alternatively known as "Grandma's Yellow", Nacogdoches Rose is the 2009 "Yellow Rose of Texas", a Texas Superstar

Nacogdoches Rose is a spectacular landscape addition, due to the blooming period starting in late winter and continuing till the next freeze. Wild temperature fluctuations will cause it to stop blooming, but only for a short time. The flowers are a rich shade of yellow, and can have up to 25 petals. They stand out nicely against the dark green leaves. 

Provide adequate drainage, and Nacogdoches Rose can grow in acidic or alkaline soils. 


Rose, Peach Drift

Rose, Peach Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meiggili'

Peach Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/596/index.htm


Rose, Pink Drift

Rose, Pink Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meijocos'

Pink Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/597/index.htm


Rose, Red Drift

Rose, Red Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meigalpio'

Red Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/598/index.htm


Rose, Sweet Drift

Rose, Sweet Drift

Botanical Name: Rosa x 'Meiswetdom'

Sweet Drift Roses are a patented rose from Conard-Pyle, and information on them can be found here : 

http://www.conard-pyle.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/drplants.plantDetail/plant_id/968/index.htm


Rosemary, Weeping

Rosemary, Weeping

Botanical Name: Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus'

A Mediterranean native that is no stranger to hot and dry conditions on top of rocky soils. The highly aromatic needle-like leaves are complimented in the late winter with small blue flowers, no more than one inch in diameter and somewhat tubular. The weeping rosemary is an excellent choice for raised beds, where the leaves can drape over and cover the wall. 

Rosemary requires well-drained alkaline soils, otherwise will be easily prone to disease and dieback when overwatered. No matter the location in the landscape, full sun must be provided. The foliage is commonly used in cooking, aroma therapy, and for medicinal purposes. 


Ruellia, Katie Mexican Petunia

Ruellia, Katie Mexican Petunia

Botanical Name: Ruellia x brittoniana 'Katie'

Dwarf cultivar of Ruellia that grows very quickly, spreading quickly through reseeding. Delicate looking trumpet flowers are a blue-purple hue, and at the top of the plant borne in clusters up to three. They start to appear in late spring, and continue till fall.

Highly drought and heat tolerant, and can become invasive if used in small areas.

 


Salvia, Blue

Salvia, Blue

Botanical Name: Salvia sinaloensis

Mexican native salvia with a compact spreading growth habit. The stems and flower calyx are both slightly hairy; neon blue flowers with white spots on the lower petals appear spring to fall and are very distinguishable against the bronze-green foliage.

Underground stolons allow Bicolor Sage to spread out, easily becoming a perennial groundcover.

Member of Plants for Texas Program


Salvia, Greggii Coral

Salvia, Greggii Coral

Botanical Name: Salvia greggii
Popular summer blooming perennial available in shades of red, white, pink, coral, and raspberry. Grows three feet tall and wide.

Salvia, Greggii Pink

Salvia, Greggii Pink

Botanical Name: Salvia greggii
Popular summer blooming perennial available in shades of red, white, pink, coral, and raspberry. Grows three feet tall and wide.

Salvia, Greggii Raspberry

Salvia, Greggii Raspberry

Botanical Name: Salvia greggii
Popular summer blooming perennial available in shades of red, white, pink, coral, and raspberry. Grows three feet tall and wide.

Salvia, Greggii Red

Salvia, Greggii Red

Botanical Name: Salvia greggii
Popular summer blooming perennial available in shades of red, white, pink, coral, and raspberry. Grows three feet tall and wide.

Salvia, Greggii White

Salvia, Greggii White

Botanical Name: Salvia greggii
Popular summer blooming perennial available in shades of red, white, pink, coral, and raspberry. Grows three feet tall and wide.

Salvia, Mealy Blue Sage

Salvia, Mealy Blue Sage

Botanical Name: Salvia farinacea 'Evolution'
Summer blooming perennial that grows three feet tall and two feet wide. Light and dark blue cultivars available.

Salvia, Mexican Bush Sage

Salvia, Mexican Bush Sage

Botanical Name: Salvia leucantha
Tough, low maintenance perennial with stunning purple & white blooms throughout the summer months. Grows four feet tall and wide.

Salvia, Red Hot Sally

Salvia, Red Hot Sally

Botanical Name: Salvia splendens
Popular summer blooming perennial that attracts butterflies and bees easily. Quite heat tolerant for a summer annual, deadheading will promote better blooms. Fall 2008 Cultivar : Vista Red

Satsuma Mandarin

Satsuma Mandarin

Botanical Name: Citrus reticulata 'Miho'

Known as Mandarin, Tangerine, or Satsuma, this citrus tree is known simply for its tasty fruit. 

The lance shaped leaves are shiny dark green and have winged petioles, making them look trifoliate. They sometimes hide the spines that you’ll find on the stems. Overall, the Mandarin tree will form a natural symmetrical round crown that rarely needs pruning. Extremely fragrant flowers appear in the spring attracting a multitude of honeybees. In the fall and early winter, the four-inch wide mandarins will ripen and are loose-skinned and sweet to the taste; they must remain on the tree till fully ripened.

It is somewhat cold hardy, but still best planted on the southern side of a building for protection, or grown in containers so it can be moved in the winter when needed. If exposed to extreme lows, the leaves will completely drop, but return in the spring if it wasn’t too serious. 


Senisa, Compact

Senisa, Compact

Botanical Name: Leucophyllum frutescens 'Compacta'

Senisa, or Cenizo, is a Texas native shrub that tolerates just about any type or condition of soil as long as excellent drainage is provided; tolerates heat, drought, and salt spray very well.

The semi-loose round growth habit can be amended with regular pruning, encouraging a tighter and more uniform growth habit. The silver foliage is moderately pubescent, no more than one inch in length. Purple-pink tubular flowers appear throughout the growing season, primarily after a healthy rain.

Senisa is a superior choice for xeriscaping, but can fit easily into any greenscape. No serious pest or disease issues. 


Senisa, Greencloud

Senisa, Greencloud

Botanical Name: Leucophyllum frutescens 'Greencloud'

Senisa, or Cenizo, is a Texas native shrub that tolerates just about any type or condition of soil as long as excellent drainage is provided; tolerates heat, drought, and salt spray very well.

The semi-loose round growth habit can be amended with regular pruning, encouraging a tighter and more uniform growth habit. The foliage is moderately pubescent, no more than one inch in length. Purple-pink tubular flowers appear throughout the growing season, primarily after a healthy rain. 'Greencloud' has a slightly faster growth habit over Compact Senisa, and the foliage is grayish-green. 

Senisa is a superior choice for xeriscaping, but can fit easily into any greenscape. No notable pest or disease issues. 


Skullcap

Skullcap

Botanical Name: Scutellaria suffrutescens
Semi-deciduous perennial that blooms spring to fall, establishing a small twelve inch tall and two foot wide ball. Good drainage is a must.

Snapdragons

Snapdragons

Botanical Name: Antirrhinum majus

Available spring-summer-fall

We carry a dwarf cultivar called 'Tahiti' and also the regular 'Skyrocket'. 'Tahiti' is a cultivar that is more heat tolerant and gets only 8-10" tall. Best planted 6" apart. They come in yellow, pink, purple, and red. 'Skyrocket can reach up to 15-20", but requires more water.

Spring 2011 Cultivars expected :


Montego Pink
Montego Purple
Montego Red
Montego White
Montego Yellow


Southern Wax Myrtle

Southern Wax Myrtle

Botanical Name: Myrica cerifera

Native to the east Texas wetlands, Southern Wax Myrtle easily adapts to poorer soils, hot and dry conditions, and salty areas. It is a multi-trunked large shrub or small tree, spreading easily with an extensive underground root system. Naturally forms an open, irregular form, but responds well to pruning into a formed hedge or bonsai habit.

Wax Myrtle is dioecious; males display small  yellow-green catkins up to an inch long in the early spring, while in the late summer females have small inconspicuous flowers followed by small blue berries. The lime green leaves can be up to four inches long but only half an inch wide and are slightly aromatic when bruised. Small yellow glands are on the leaves, sometimes mistakened for a pest or disease.

A dwarf cultivar, ‘Nana’, reaches only five feet high and wide. 


Sumac, Evergreen

Sumac, Evergreen

Botanical Name: Rhus Virens

A Texas native that struggles to be a small tree, and naturally forms a multitrunked large shrub.   The compound leaves of the Evergreen Sumac start out pinkish-green, and turn lustrous dark green shortly after. In the winter the foliage turns maroon, falling off completely in the late winter as it begins to put on new foliage.

The new stems emerge red with a layer of gray fuzz, but turn green with age as well. The smooth light-gray bark predominates most of the stems, but the main trunk with age begins to form a patchwork of scaly bark that gives it an older, handsome look.

The small flowers are slightly fragrant and greenish-white, appearing in clusters in the late summer. The small red drupe fruits are slightly pubescent and continue to compliment the foliage throughout the winter while birds feast on them. Only females will produce the flowers and fruit.

Low maintenance and drought tolerant -- as long as the soil is not too moist, will adapt to any condition. 


Sumac, Flameleaf

Sumac, Flameleaf

Botanical Name: Rhus copallina

A Texas native shrub that tries to be a small tree, however the stems are thin and droop easily with age. Naturally forms an irregular crown with crooked, spreading branches. Underground rhizomes, coupled with its ease of self-seeding, allow this Sumac to quickly create thickets and massings.

The name “Winged Sumac” comes from the easily identifiable leaf stalk being winged between leaflets. The dark green foliage in the summer is complimented by the large tight terminal panicle of flowers, yellow-green in color.  “Flame Leaf Sumac” comes from the outstanding red foliage in the fall, which is complimented by the multitude of red drupe berries following the blooms mid-summer.

This sumac is very low maintenance, and highly drought tolerant; an ideal choice for harsh landscape environments that demand some type of vegetation. 


Sweet Olive

Sweet Olive

Botanical Name: Osmanthus fragrans

Native to Asia, the Sweet Olive established itself in the Texas landscape with the invigorating odor of its clusters of white blooms that appear in early and late winter. It is best planted near windows or walkways where the blooms can be enjoyed.

Sweet Olive is slow growing, but long lived. It will require pruning and maintenance if a uniform, thick form is desired; naturally grows leggy with foliage growing on ends of new branches while it’s dropping from the base. The leaves are shiny and dark green – can be serrated or smooth on the same branch.

Poor soils are tolerated, but will thrive in moist soils with regular fertilization. Can be grown in pots in colder climates to be brought into greenhouses. 


Sweet Potato Vine

Sweet Potato Vine

Botanical Name: Ipomoea batatas 'Blackie'

Medium-fast growing perennial vine with black heart-shaped leaves. Tolerates the Texas heat and full sun, but exhibits much richer color when grown in partial shade. Grows best in well-drained but moist soils either as a groundcover or cascading in hanging baskets. Small blooms are biolet to lavender in color. 


Sycamore, Mexican

Sycamore, Mexican

Botanical Name: Platanus occidentalis 'Mexicana'

The Mexican Sycamore was introduced to the Southern Texas landscapes in the past decade; its higher resistance to bacterial leaf scorch makes it a superior substitute to the American Sycamore. In addition, it prefers alkaline soils and is generally insect and disease free; very fast growing. The bark peels off in irregular patches as the tree grows, giving a handsome mottled look.

The top of the large leaves are green, while undersides a silvery pubescent hue, growing up to eight inches across. They turn brown in the fall and if windy, blow effortlessly into your neighbor’s yard, saving you time and energy in raking them up.

Mexican Sycamore is monoecious, meaning male and female flowers are separated but borne on the same tree, and pollinated by the wind. Pollinated female flowers will form a stiff ball, covered with densely compacted mesh of several hundred seeds, forming a ball measuring 1.5 inches in diameter. In the winter, the cohesion of the ball breaks down releasing the hundreds of seeds into the wind to be blown away – maybe to your neighbor’s yard yet again – the gift that keeps giving!


Tangerine

Tangerine

Botanical Name: Citrus reticulata 'Changsha'

'Changsha' is an older hybrid of the Citrus reticulata that is one of the cold-hardiest of the citrus for Texas. When grown from seed and acclimated to the landscape, it can tolerate temperatures as low as 15 F. 

Known as Mandarin, Tangerine, or Satsuma, this citrus tree is known simply for its tasty fruit. 

The lance shaped leaves are shiny dark green and have winged petioles, making them look trifoliate. They sometimes hide the spines that you’ll find on the stems. Overall, the Mandarin tree will form a natural symmetrical round crown that rarely needs pruning. Extremely fragrant flowers appear in the spring attracting a multitude of honeybees. In the fall and early winter, the four-inch wide mandarins will ripen and are loose-skinned and sweet to the taste; they must remain on the tree till fully ripened.

It is somewhat cold hardy, but still best planted on the southern side of a building for protection, or grown in containers so it can be moved in the winter when needed. If exposed to extreme lows, the leaves will completely drop, but return in the spring if it wasn’t too serious. 


Turk's Cap

Turk's Cap

Botanical Name: Malvaviscus arboreus var. Drummondii
Shade tolerant perennial with an upright growth habit. Fushia-pink flowers appear summer to fall. Reaches four feet in height and two feet width.

Verbena, Pink

Verbena, Pink

Botanical Name: Verbena x hybrida
Tough, low maintenance perennial with flower colors ranging from red, pink, and burgandy. Very tough plant for the summer, reaching three feet in height.

Verbena, Purple

Verbena, Purple

Botanical Name: Verbena x hybrida
Tough, low maintenance perennial with flower colors ranging from red, pink, and burgandy. Very tough plant for the summer, reaching three feet in height.

Verbena, Red

Verbena, Red

Botanical Name: Verbena x hybrida

Tough, low maintenance perennial with flower colors ranging from red, pink, and burgandy. Very tough plant for the summer, reaching three feet in height.

 

Cultivars under red : 

Scarlett Lanaii


Viburnum, Chindo

Viburnum, Chindo

Botanical Name: Viburnum awabuki 'Chindo'

A native to South Korea, Awabuki is one of the fastest growing viburnums available. The leaves emerge light green,  turning dark green and reaching up to eight inches long; they are very lustrous and have a leathery texture to them.  It’s best to prune in late winter to promote even, uniform growth throughout the summer – it won’t hurt to prune the excessive growth midsummer to put another flush round of foliage before winter. Grows unchecked as a large shrub, but can easily be trimmed into a small, multi-branched tree with a natural round canopy.

Fragrant white blooms appear in the late spring, leaving red berries soon after that turn black by the fall, attracting birds easily. As with all viburnums, it has some of the highest deer tolerance. Best grown in moist, fertile soils but can be forgiving of slightly less conditions. 


Viburnum, Suspensum

Viburnum, Suspensum

Botanical Name: Viburnum suspensum

Native to Japan, the Sandankwa Viburnum is an excellent deer resistant shrub with an open spreading growth habit. Branches quickly grow out of the main shrub, but regular pruning will encourage a small, compact and full shape. Unpruned, it will grow ragged, reaching up to twelve feet tall and wide. The leaves start light green, but become dark green as they mature. They are oval-shaped with serrated edges, highly aromatic, and sometimes used in flower arrangements.

Small tubular flowers are borne on the ends of new branches in the spring, and sporadically appear in the summer. They are white to pale pink, followed by small red berries in the fall that attract wildlife. Moist, well drained soils are highly recommended. 


Viburnum, Sweet

Viburnum, Sweet

Botanical Name: Viburnum odoratissimum

The Sweet Viburnum is an excellent large shrub or small tree native to Asia that has established itself in the Texan landscape. It is fast growing and relatively pest and disease free, and as a viburnum it’s as deer resistant as any plant can hope for. The smooth, leathery leaves can grow up to six inches long; they are dull green on one side and bright green on the other.

In full sun, it creates a thick and lush shrub that is ideal for privacy screens or sound breaks along fence lines. In the shade it will not grow as robust, but slight pruning will encourage thicker growth. With only minimum pruning of lower branches, it easily forms into a small tree with a natural multi-trunked canopy.

In the spring, tiny white flowers nearly cover the entire plant and are very fragrant, contributing to its name. Red drupe berries follow, turning black in the fall, attracting birds easily.


Vinca Major

Vinca Major

Botanical Name: Vinca major
Evergreen vine that spreads up to five feet in width, and grows slightly over 12 inches in height. Light blue flowers appear on new growth throughout the spring and summer.

Vinca Periwinkle

Vinca Periwinkle

Botanical Name: Catharanthus roseus
Quick growing annual with glossy green foliage and handsome flowers that can be white, pink, red, or purple. Does very well in hot and dry climates. Effective when planted in massings or borders. Cultivars for Spring 2009: First Kiss Blueberry Pacifica Cherry Halo Pacifica Dark Red Pacifica Deep Orchid Pacifica Lilac Pacifica Magenta Halo Pacifica Pink Pacifica Polka Dot Pacifica Punch Pacifica Pure White Pacifica XP Coral Pacifica XP Dark Red Pacifica XP Lilac Pacifica XP Polka Dot Pacifica XP White Santa Fe Coral

Vitex, Chaste Tree

Vitex, Chaste Tree

Botanical Name: Vitex agnus-castus

Vitex, also known as Chaste Tree, is a small deciduous ornamental tree that grows fairly fast and is tolerant of adverse environments such as heat, drought, high winds, and poor soil types. Although native to Europe and Asia, it has become naturalized in the southern states and used extensively.

Aromatic palmately compound leaves have 5 to 7 leaflets that are dark green on top and grey-green on the bottom. Thanks to the unique leaves it is sometimes mistaken for marijuana. When in bloom it is also easily mistaken for Buttterfly Tree.

Flower clusters appear on the season’s new growth in the late spring, forming a display of multiple flower spikes at the end of the branches, continuing through the summer; butterflies, bees, and humming birds will visit throughout the blooming period. Colors in cultivation include violet, blue, purple, and white.


Willow, Desert Burgundy

Willow, Desert Burgundy

Botanical Name: Chilopsis linearis 'Burgundy'

A tough and durable Texas native tree from west Texas that fits in nearly any Texan landscape. It is not a true willow --its name from the graceful, narrow green leaves.

Flowers emerge in terminal clusters starting in the spring on new branches, and continue to appear until fall. Butterflies and hummingbirds are easily attracted to the slightly fragrant, bell to funnel-shaped flowers. Colors range from light pink to light violet, with variations in white and burgundy. Long, slender seed capsules persist in the winter after the leaves have already fallen, opening slowly to release fluffy winged seeds that can get carried in the wind.  

Desert Willow is fast growing, tolerant of hot and dry conditions, and relatively pest and disease free. Regular fertilization and watering results in a quick growing shade tree that will fill an empty space in any landscape.


Wisteria, Chinese

Wisteria, Chinese

Botanical Name: Wisteria sinensis
Vigorous deciduous vine that often requires maintenance, growing up to 30 feet in length. Extremely fragrant purple blooms appear in the spring before foliage. Easily climbs almost any material, although quite attractive when trimmed into a small tree form.

Xylosma

Xylosma

Botanical Name: Xylosma congestum

Native to China, the Xylosma is an ideal selection for privacy screens, windbreaks, or foundation plantings as it grows wider than it gets tall. Commonly grown as a shrub, it can be pruned into a tree form. New foliage starts out red to bronze, then turns glossy green while on long, graceful arching stems. Xylosma isn’t susceptible to many plant diseases or pest.

Inconspicuous yellow-green blooms appear in the early fall, but are followed by small black fruits that compliment the foliage well. Although evergreen, the Xylosma can drop leaves if exposed to freezing temperatures.


Yarrow,

Yarrow, "Moonshine"

Botanical Name: Achillea millefolium 'Moonshine'
Striking clump-forming perennial with silver-green leaves contrasted against clusters of yellow flowers. First appearing in spring, the flowers blooms appear till the first frost and work well in dried flower arrangements. The pleasant fragrance makes it ideal near walkways where it will attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Yarrow tolerates average to poor soils, however will require good drainage; it will suffer in moist soils. Under ideal conditions it will spread quickly and possibly become invasive to its neighboring plants.

Yew, Japanese

Yew, Japanese

Botanical Name: Podocarpus macrophyllus

Slow growing evergreen shrub native to Japan and southern China that has adapted well to the southern landscape. Naturally forms a conical to dome shape, and is commonly pruned into uniformed shapes for hedges, topiaries, or screens. The foliage is dark green and needlelike, whorled around the stems. Male plants have catkins that produce pollen. The females produce blue-green berries attached to attractive, yet mildly toxic,  droop fruits that can be red, yellow, and dark purple.

The Japanese Yew tolerates poor soil conditions as long as good drainage is provided. Japanese Yew grows well in the shade and sun, and can fit a variety of landscape needs when pruned into any form.


Yucca, Red

Yucca, Red

Botanical Name: Hesperaloe parviflora

A Texas native succulent plant that is an ideal choice for hot and dry areas. The leaves grow up to four feet long, rolled up halfway and have curly threads along the margins. It will form clumps over time, reaching an average width of five feet.

Flower stalks first appear in the spring and through the summer bearing many coral-pink flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

Red Yucca is tolerant of many adverse soil conditions and blooms best in full sun. It also tolerates salty environments.


Yucca, Sotol

Yucca, Sotol

Botanical Name: Dasylirion texanum

Inappropriately named, the Sotol Yucca is a member of the Lily Family. Despite this, it is a tough and durable Texas native that makes a fine addition in any Texas landscape. Sotol forms a rosette of leaves that are only up to three feet long, but are lined with a multitude of very sharp spines; be sure to plant away from any walking paths.

Extravagant flower stalks can reach up to fifteen feet in height, then the flower spike reaches an additional three feet. Numerous small greenish-white flowers appear on the flower spike starting in mid-summer and persist into the fall, easily attracting butterflies. The Sotol Yucca is dioecious, meaning the flowers are either male or female on the single plant.

 


Yucca, Weeping

Yucca, Weeping

Botanical Name: Yucca recurvifolia

A naturalized Texas shrub with excellent tolerance to hot and dry climates. The blueish-green flat leaves have a sharp tip, and grow up to three feet in length, bending downward over time. Weeping Yucca begins as a uniform rosette shrub, growing upward on a single trunk reaching heights of five to six feet before falling over its own weight. New trunks will sprout where the main trunk makes contact with the ground, making it a multi-trunk shrub.

The flower stalk can grow up to five feet above the foliage, displaying a large cluster of white to pale yellow bell-shaped flowers in the early spring that last into the summer.


Zinnia

Zinnia

Botanical Name: Zinnia elegans
Mortellaro's Nursery stocks only dwarf cultivars of Zinnia elegans. This attractive annual has an upright bushy growth habit, with solitary daisy like flowers in a variety of colors. Zinnias are best planted in well drained soil in full sun, and watered infrequently as they are susceptible to leaf spot and mildew. The best way to inhibit powdery mildew is plant them in an open space with plenty of air circulation. They are an ideal Texas summer annual as it enjoys the hot summers up till the first fall frost. Cultivars for Spring 2009: Magellan Coral Magellan Scarlet Magellan Yellow

Zinnia, Profusion

Zinnia, Profusion

Botanical Name: Zinnia hybrida 'Profusion'
A tough annual known to be weather and disease resistant, this annual blooms continuously from spring to frost. Grows best in full sun with fertile well drained soil. Awarded the AAS Gold Medal due to its inherit resistance to diseases, and picked as an All American Selections in 2001 for the outstanding blooming period. Also cataloged as Zinnia angustifolia x elegans Available in White, Orange, or Red. 2008 Fall Cultivars Available: Profusion White Profusion Orange Profusion Fire