Shrubs, trees, ground covers, native plants, and seasonal color

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Click on any of the alpha indexes below to view the corresponding lists of plants.

The default list is displayed alphabetically by common name for all plant types. You can view the plants by clicking on the Scientific Name or limit the plant type by using the drop down.

Plants actively being grown for the current season are shown -- selecting Discontinued Items will show plants we have offered in the past. 

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Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Celosia Dragon's Breath

Celosia Dragon's Breath

Botanical Name: Celosia argentea 'Dragons Breath®'

Celosia 'Dragon's Breath' is a striking annual plant renowned for its fiery foliage and unique appearance, making a bold statement in garden landscapes. Its vibrant, flame-colored plumes rise above lush green foliage, creating a captivating display of color and texture. 'Dragon's Breath' stands out for its compact growth habit, making it suitable for borders, containers, or mass plantings. This heat-tolerant and drought-resistant cultivar thrives in sunny locations with well-drained soil, providing a burst of color throughout the summer months. Its resilience and eye-catching aesthetics make it a popular choice for landscape designers and gardeners seeking to infuse their outdoor spaces with drama and intensity.


Cherry Laurel, Compact

Cherry Laurel, Compact

Botanical Name: Prunus caroliniana 'Compacta'

Compact Cherry Laurel offers an excellent solution for landscaping in the diverse soil conditions of Texas. This Texas-Native evergreen shrub not only thrives in slightly acidic soils but has good tolerance for alkaline soils, making it adaptable to the varying pH levels commonly found throughout the state. Its versatility in soil preference allows for widespread cultivation in gardens, parks, and urban landscapes across Texas, providing year-round beauty and functionality. 

Compact Cherry Laurel boasts a robust growth habit, making it an ideal choice for creating dense hedges or privacy screens. When planting in rows, spacing each shrub approximately 3 to 6 feet apart ensures proper airflow and ample room for growth while allowing for customization based on desired density. Cherry Laurel prefers full sun, but can grow in shaded areas, although will not have as dense foliage.

Furthermore, Compact Cherry Laurel exhibits deer-resistant properties, making it particularly well-suited for regions where deer browsing poses a challenge to gardeners. Its aromatic foliage deters deer while providing an attractive backdrop of glossy green leaves year-round. Small fragrant white flowers appear in late winter to early spring, followed by black berries that ripen in the summer and provide food to wildlife.


Chili Pequin

Chili Pequin

Botanical Name: Capsicum annumm 'pequin'

Chili pepper plant is a very productive semi-compact pepper plant with open free growth habit. Tiny peppers are enjoyed by birds leading it to be sprouting up all over the yard after a few years.


Coleus, Mixed

Coleus, Mixed

Botanical Name: Coleus x

Popular fast growing bedding plant for the summer that does best in filtered to full shade.

Attractive foliage is opposite and simple, ovate leaves. Come in shades of yellow, dull red, purple, and pale green. Flowers are dark blue to cream, displayed in terminal spike-like racemes that reach three inches long.

Coleus needs loose, well drained fertile soil, and does well as an underplanting. Mealy bugs are a problem when grown in full shade, and frequent trimming will ensure a thick bushy plant.

2010 Spring - Summer Cultivars :

Burgundy Sun
Dipt in Wine
Fishnet Stockings
Floridasun Jade
Floridasun Rose
Pineapple
Red Coat
Magilla
Wizard Mix
Wizard Mosaic


Cone Flower

Cone Flower

Botanical Name: Echinacea purpurea 'Pow Wow'

Coneflower (Echinacea) is a hardy perennial known for its vibrant, daisy-like flowers and resilience in a variety of garden settings. Popular for its long blooming season from summer to fall, it thrives in full sun and well-drained soil, making it an excellent choice for drought-tolerant landscapes. Coneflowers are also attractive to pollinators like bees and butterflies and are deer resistant, adding ecological and aesthetic value to gardens.

Two notable cultivars are PowWow and Artisan Red. The PowWow series, particularly 'PowWow Wild Berry,' is celebrated for its vibrant magenta-pink flowers and compact growth, reaching about 16-24 inches in height. It is known for its prolific blooming and excellent heat and drought tolerance. The Artisan Red cultivar offers striking red-orange flowers, providing a bold color contrast in garden beds. Both cultivars maintain the robust, low-maintenance qualities of the coneflower, making them popular choices for gardeners seeking vibrant, resilient plants.


Copper Canyon Daisy

Copper Canyon Daisy

Botanical Name: Tagetes lemmonii

Bushy perennial that heavily covers itself with yellow daisy-like blooms in the spring and fall, and intermittently during the summer. Great tolerance to hot and dry areas. Grows up to six feet tall and four feet wide, but can get weedy-looking and will recover quickly from pruning in the warm seasons. Foliage has a bitter aroma.


Member of Plants for Texas Program


Coreopsis

Coreopsis

Botanical Name: Coreopsis UPTICK Gold & Bronze 'Baluptred'

Coreopsis Uptick Gold & Bronze is a delightful plant that is prized for its vibrant and showy blooms.

The Uptick Gold & Bronze variety of Coreopsis has a compact and upright habit that grows up to 12-18 inches tall and spreads up to 12-16 inches wide. The leaves are lance-shaped and have a bright green color that forms a dense, bushy mound. The foliage is attractive even when the plant is not in bloom.

The flowers of Coreopsis Uptick Gold & Bronze are the main attraction. They bloom profusely from early summer until fall, producing clusters of bright golden-yellow flowers with a bronze-red center. The flowers are 1-2 inches wide and have a distinctive daisy-like appearance. They are held atop sturdy stems that are well-suited to cutting for use in floral arrangements.

Coreopsis Uptick Gold & Bronze is an easy-to-grow plant that thrives in full sun to partial shade and well-draining soil. It is drought-tolerant and can withstand some humidity. The plant is relatively low-maintenance and does not require much pruning or fertilization. Deadheading spent blooms will encourage continuous blooming throughout the growing season.


Cotoneaster, Grayleaf

Cotoneaster, Grayleaf

Botanical Name: Cotoneaster glaucophyllus

Often mispronounced as the two separate words Coton and Easter, Cotoneaster is one of the more durable and hardy landscape shrubs for the Texas landscape. It tolerates urban conditions, poor soils, and even drought – but thrives when given favorable care.

It has an appealing shade of gray-green foliage that is slightly pubescent, arranged on low arching branches that somewhat form a thicket. The small leaves and compact form allow to be pruned into thick hedges easily. Clusters of small white flowers appear on the branches throughout the spring, and are followed by red berries that persist throughout the fall. 


Crape Myrtle, Basham

Crape Myrtle, Basham

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Basham'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Basham' is a large growing cultivar with light pink blooms; it is a powdery mildew resistant cultivar. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds. 

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Dynamite

Crape Myrtle, Dynamite

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Dynamite'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Natchez

Crape Myrtle, Natchez

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Natchez'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Natchez' is a large cultivar, one of the largest available, with bright white blooms. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Pink Velour

Crape Myrtle, Pink Velour

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Pink Velour'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Pink Velour has burgundy-green leaves that get dark red-bronze in the fall, with pink blooms. Powdery Mildew resistant cultivar.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Purple

Crape Myrtle, Purple

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Catawba' is a medium sized tree, with a fine rich purple bloom color. 

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Red

Crape Myrtle, Red

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crape Myrtle, Red Rocket

Crape Myrtle, Red Rocket

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Red Rocket'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Red Rocket' is an improved powdery mildew resistance cultivar with rich red blooms.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Tuscarora

Crape Myrtle, Tuscarora

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Tuscarora'

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

'Tuscarora' is an improved powdery mildew resistance cultivar with light red blooms, often used in leu of Watermelon Red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established. 


Crape Myrtle, Twilight

Crape Myrtle, Twilight

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica 'Twilight'

he Twilight Crape Myrtle is highly suitable for Texas landscapes due to its robust adaptability and striking visual appeal. Its deep purple to nearly black flowers, which bloom from mid-summer to fall, provide extended seasonal color. This makes it an excellent choice for adding vibrant contrast in garden designs, either as a standalone specimen or within mixed borders.

From a practical standpoint, the Twilight Crape Myrtle is exceptionally drought-tolerant and thrives in Texas' hot, sunny climate. It requires minimal irrigation and adapts well to various soil types, including clay and sandy loam. Its resistance to common pests and diseases, such as powdery mildew and aphids, reduces maintenance needs, making it a reliable option for sustainable landscaping in the region.

Additionally, the Twilight Crape Myrtle supports local ecosystems by attracting pollinators like bees and butterflies. Its distinctive peeling bark adds winter interest and provides habitat for small wildlife. Incorporating this tree into urban and suburban landscapes can enhance ecological diversity and resilience, offering both aesthetic and environmental benefits in the challenging Texan climate.

 

Crape Myrtle, White

Crape Myrtle, White

Botanical Name: Lagerstroemia indica

Lagerstroemia is a genus with over 50 species and numerous cultivars to offer trees, shrubs, and weeping shrubs that can be utilized for just about any purpose in the landscape. Crape Myrtles are primarily grown for their long-lasting blooms – up to 120 days!  Most species also have a smooth bark that sheds thin layers throughout the year, uncovering inner bark that is shades of gray or even cinnamon-red.

Flowers begin to emerge in the early summer after foliage, in panicles of crinkled small flowers with a crepe-like feel and look. They last longer if the plant is not terribly overwatered. When the blooms finally being to drop, they are followed by a large number of capsule fruits that can weigh down the branches. If it’s still early in the ear, prune the fruits to promote another round of flowering. If untrimmed, the large green fruits will dry out, turning into black husk that split open to release numerous small seeds.

Blooms only appear on new branches, so it’s not uncommon to prune them in the winter. Unfortunately, larger specimens are often butchered back severely to encourage additional branches and many more blooms. Since most crape myrtles recover nicely, they are routinely victimized by those without taste.  

Simple opposite green leaves emerge early in the spring, and vary in size according to the cultivar. They turn a lovely shade of red, orange, or yellow in the fall. Crape Myrtles appreciate moist soils, but tolerate dry conditions once they are established.

 


Crossvine

Crossvine

Botanical Name: Bignonia capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty'

A Texas native semi-evergreen vine that climbs fences, trellises, and trees easily with its small tendrils. It can reach lengths up to 40 feet, easily attracting hummingbirds and butterflies throughout the blooming season.

'Tangerine Beauty' is a cultivar reintroduced by J.C. Ralston of the University of North Carolina. The flowers are borne in clusters, each being pinkish-red with an orange-yellow throat. The bright green leaves turn an attractive red to purple hue in the winter after the first cold front. .

Crossvine is somewhat drought and poor soil tolerant, exhibiting no pest issues.


Cuphea, Bat Face

Cuphea, Bat Face

Botanical Name: Cuphea llavea

Small mounding perennial native to Mexico that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies easily. Produces a multitude of 1" red tubular flowers with purple throats open at the end with small patterns of a bat (hence the name)

Member of Plants for Texas Program


Cuphea, Dwarf Mexican Heather

Cuphea, Dwarf Mexican Heather

Botanical Name: Cuphea hyssopifolia

Quick growing Mexican native perennial that reaches only twelve inches tall and wide returning in the spring if mulched heavily. Small attractive purple flowers appear in the early summer that stay till winter.

Attracts bees and butterflies easily.


Cypress, Italian

Cypress, Italian

Botanical Name: Cupressus sempervirens

Italian Cypress stands as an iconic and striking addition to the Texas landscape, offering a host of benefits for gardeners seeking elegance and structure in their outdoor spaces. Renowned for its stately, columnar form, this evergreen conifer provides a vertical accent that adds height and drama to gardens across the state. With its exceptional cold tolerance, Italian Cypress thrives in the diverse climates of Texas, enduring both the intense heat of summer and occasional winter frosts with ease…except for the 2021 freeze which did unfortunately kill many over the state. Its ability to maintain its deep green foliage year-round ensures a constant source of color and texture in the landscape, enhancing the visual appeal of gardens, parks, and urban spaces alike.

Italian Cypress prefers well-draining soils with a slightly acidic to neutral pH level, though it can tolerate a range of soil types commonly found in Texas, including sandy loams and clay soils. This adaptability to varying soil conditions makes it a versatile choice for landscaping projects throughout the state, from coastal regions to inland areas. Its ability to withstand periods of drought once established further enhances its suitability for water-conscious gardeners in Texas, contributing to sustainable landscape practices and water conservation efforts.

Its dense foliage provides privacy, noise reduction, and wind protection, making it particularly well-suited for urban and suburban landscapes in Texas. With its cold tolerance, adaptable soil preferences, and versatility in pruning, Italian Cypress stands as an enduring and timeless choice for enhancing the beauty and functionality of gardens throughout the Lone Star State.


Cypress, Montezuma

Cypress, Montezuma

Botanical Name: Taxodium mucronatum

Native to Mexico and the Rio Grande area of Texas, Montezuma Cypress is also known as Sabino or Ahuehuete; it is the national tree of Mexico. There is a specimen called “Tule” in Santa Maria that is estimated to be 2,000 years old.

Montezuma Cypress tree is an ideal substitute for the Bald Cypress, as it holds onto its leaves better during cold weather. In warmer areas of Southern Texas, it remains evergreen. Extremely versatile as it thrives in river beds and standing water, it tolerates drought like conditions anywhere in Texas.  When grown in standing water, it produces “knees” that are characteristic of the Taxodium cypresses.

They are often staked when cultivated in the nursery industry, as they are fast growing and the wood is weak when young. The branches have a natural weeping habit to them, and have pinnately arranged flat leaves that are needle-like, looking very delicate from a distance. The tree forms a broad spreading crown. The bark is brown to tan in color, with slight shredded-like exfoliation.